Phytomyza notopleuralis Spencer

Eiseman, Charles S., Lonsdale, Owen, Linden, John Van Der, Feldman, Tracy S. & Palmer, Michael W., 2021, Thirteen new species of Agromyzidae (Diptera) from the United States, with new host and distribution records for 32 additional species, Zootaxa 4931 (1), pp. 1-68: 36-37

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4931.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:88CF2B0D-E02B-46E1-9F52-1B95F717FC8F

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4545287

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0395A00B-7001-EB68-2A99-F8EE61106462

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Phytomyza notopleuralis Spencer
status

 

Phytomyza notopleuralis Spencer  

( Figs. 58 View FIGURES 48–58 , 84 View FIGURES 73–86 )

Material examined. MASSACHUSETTS: Berkshire Co., Great Barrington , 42.197870, -73.335897, 17.ix.2017, em. ~ 16.iv.2018, C.S. Eiseman, ex Cornus sericea   , # CSE4416, CNC1144083–1144084 View Materials (1♁ 1♀) GoogleMaps   .

Host. * Cornaceae   : Cornus sericea L.  

Leaf mine. ( Fig. 84 View FIGURES 73–86 ) Entirely linear, on the upper leaf surface; frass in somewhat liquidy strips along the sides.

Puparium. Shining dark brown with paler brown intersegmental boundaries; formed outside the mine.

Phenology and voltinism. Our specimens were collected as larvae in mid-September and emerged as adults the following spring. There is presumably at least one earlier generation; the only other known specimens were collected as adults on 3 June (Ontario) and 9 July (Michigan) ( Spencer 1969; Spencer & Steyskal 1986).

Distribution. USA: *MA, MI; Canada: ON ( Spencer & Steyskal 1986).

Comments. Neither Spencer (1969) nor Spencer & Steyskal (1986) made any statements about the possible relationships of Phytomyza notopleuralis   to other Phytomyza   . Winkler et al. (2009) indicated that it is near P. spinaciae Hendel   , a Palearctic species mining leaves of Cynareae   ( Asteraceae   ) and forming a white puparium within the leaf, and placed it in the syngenesiae group. However, the leaf mine is identical with that of P. agromyzina Meigen   , which feeds on various dogwoods including Cornus sericea   , and the younger P. notopleuralis   may eventually prove to be its junior synonym. External morphology is nearly identical, excluding the presence of a strongly pale yellow notopleuron in P. notopleuralis   ( Fig. 58 View FIGURES 48–58 ) (yellowish tint with margins yellower in P. agromyzina   ), and the genitalia ( Spencer 1969: Fig. 470) only differ in that the distiphallus of P. agromyzina   is basally straight (not shallowly curved) and sometimes slightly abbreviated; the apex of the distiphallus is also sometimes a bit straighter. The phallus of P. agromyzina   illustrated in Spencer (1969: Fig. 395) shows the distiphallus as a simple membranous lobe without the narrow, apically forked and medially deviated sclerotized band; this is apparently an artifact of illustration, as this structure is present in all dissected material examined at the CNC.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Agromyzidae

Genus

Phytomyza