Paracilacris mordax, Naskrecki & Bazelet & Spearman, 2008

Naskrecki, Piotr, Bazelet, Corinna S. & Spearman, Lauren A., 2008, New species of flightless katydids from South Africa (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae), Zootaxa 1933 (1), pp. 19-32: 25-26

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.1933.1.3

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5231105

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03A5961C-A71C-FF8D-2483-895BFB0FF3CC

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Paracilacris mordax
status

n. sp.

Paracilacris mordax   n. sp.

( Figs. 2A–G View FIGURE 2 , 3A View FIGURE 3 )

Type locality. REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA: Free State, Golden Gate Highlands National Park, vic. Glen Reenen Rest Camp, Oribi Loop (28°30.343'S, 28°39.208'E), 2094 m, 3.xi.2005, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla —male holotype ( PPRI) GoogleMaps  

Differential diagnosis. This species is similar in coloration and appearance to P. lateralis   , but can be distinguished by the unique form of the male cercus ( Fig. 2B View FIGURE 2 ) and the short, strongly curved ovipositor (ovipositor long, nearly straight in P. lateralis   .) From P. periclitatus   it differs in the details of the reproductive structures in both sexes, smaller body size, and the shape of the male tegmen.

Description (male, except where specified)

General. Body small, robust, cylindrical; male brachypterous, female squamipterous.

Head. Fastigium of frons small, separated from fastigium of vertex by distinct gap. Fastigium of vertex parallel-sided, blunt apically, slightly narrower than antennal scapus, almost reaching apex of antennal sockets, flat dorsally; antennal scapus unarmed; antennae as long as body; frons slightly convex, oblique; eyes circular, weakly protruding.

Thorax. Pronotum surface smooth; humeral sinus of pronotum absent; marginal fold of pronotum very narrow, smooth, lateral lobe almost 2.5 times as long as high; anterior margin of pronotum straight, flat; metazona weakly convex ( Fig. 2A View FIGURE 2 ), posterior edge of metazona broadly rounded. Prosternum unarmed; thoracic auditory spiracle hidden under pronotum.

Legs. Legs short, robust. Front coxa armed with long spine, front femur unarmed ventrally; genicular lobes of front femur unarmed. Front tibia unarmed dorsally, with 4 spines on posterior and 4 on anterior ventral margin, ventral spines on front tibia short, about half as long as tibia diameter; tympanum bilaterally open, oval, about twice as long as wide. Mid femur unarmed ventrally, genicular lobes of mid femur unarmed; mid tibia not noticeably thickened in basal part. with 1–2 small spines dorsally, with 3 spines on posterior and 3–4 on anterior ventral margin. Hind femur unarmed ventrally, genicular lobes of hind femur unarmed; dorsal spines of hind tibia with alternating size, smaller and larger.

Wings. Tegmen reduced, completely hidden under pronotum; apical part truncate, nearly straight; anterior margin rounded; hind wing absent. Costal field narrow; veins Sc and R close together, parallel along their entire length; right stridulatory area with large, fully developed mirror; mirror roughly rectangular; left stridulatory area with large, fully developed mirror ( Fig. 2D View FIGURE 2 ). Stridulatory file elevated on thickened vein, straight, with 19 teeth, 1.2 mm long, 0.06 mm wide ( Fig. 2E View FIGURE 2 ). Female tegmina squamiform, shorter than quarter of pronotum.

Abdomen. Tenth tergite unmodified; epiproct unmodified, triangular. Cercus short, straight; straight when seen from side; with large, inner tooth; apex strongly flattened dorso-ventrally and distended laterally ( Fig. 2B View FIGURE 2 ); paraprocts not sclerotized, forming short, finger-like lobes pointing down; sclerotized epiphallus anchorshaped, with long, straight middle arm ( Fig. 3A View FIGURE 3 ). Subgenital plate elongate, narrowly trapezoidal, with small, triangular apical incision; styli absent ( Fig. 2C View FIGURE 2 ). Female subgenital plate broadly trapezoidal, with very shallow apical incision ( Fig. 2F View FIGURE 2 ).

Ovipositor. Ovipositor strongly curved, as long as 1/2 of hind femur, apex with strong apical teeth on both valvulae, dorsal edge of upper valvula parallel to lower valvula ( Fig. 2G View FIGURE 2 ).

Coloration. Coloration light brown, with dark markings, antennae concolorous; antennal scapus with light stripe, continuous with that on head; eyes with dark, horizontal band; face brown; occiput with dark brown median stripe, continuous with that on pronotum. Pronotum with narrow, dark brown stripe dorsally and wider, dark brown bands on lateral lobes; abdominal terga with dark brown stripe laterally, light brown dorsally. Legs unicolorous.

Measurements. (3 males, 1 female). - body: male 11.5-14 (12.4±1.4), female 14; pronotum: male 6, female 6; tegmen: male 2.5, female; hind femur: male 9-9.5 (9.3±.3), female 9.5; ovipositor: 4 mm.

Material examined. Republic of South Africa: Free State, Golden Gate Highlands National Park, vic. Glen Reenen Rest Camp, Oribi Loop , elev. 2094 m (28°30.343'S, 28°39.208'E), 3.xi. 2005, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 male (holotype) ( PPRI) GoogleMaps   ; same locality, elev. 2089 m (28°30.34'S, 28°39.165'E), 5.xi. 2005, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 female (paratype) ( PPRI) GoogleMaps   ; same locality, elev. 2088 m (28°30.339'S, 28°39.153'E), 5.xi. 2005, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 male (paratype) ( PPRI) GoogleMaps   ; Golden Gate Highlands National Park; vic. Glen Reenen RestCamp; Oribi Loop , elev. 2069 m (28°30.366'S, 28°39.211'E), 5.xi. 2005, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 male (paratype) ( ANSP) GoogleMaps   ; same locality, elev. 2011 m (28°30.355'S, 28°39.215'E), 31.iii. 2006, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 nymph male GoogleMaps   ; same locality, elev. 2009 m (28°30.332'S, 28°39.181'E), 31.iii. 2006, coll. L. Spearman & J. LaPolla — 1 nymph male ( ANSP) GoogleMaps   ; Golden Gate Nat. Park, Echo Ravine trail, elev. 1928 m (28°30'18.3''S, 28°37'8.6''E), 4.iii. 2008, coll. P. Naskrecki & C. Bazelet — 1 nymph male ( ANSP) GoogleMaps   .

Etymology. The specific epithet mordax   [Lat.], meaning “biting”, reflects the apparently very aggressive nature of this small new katydid, as reported by one of its collectors, Dr. John LaPolla.

PPRI

ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute, National Collection of Fungi: Culture Collection

ANSP

Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia