Stiriini,

Pohl, Greg, Anweiler, Gary, Schmidt, Christian & Kondla, Norbert, 2010, An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada, ZooKeys 38 (38), pp. 1-549: 265-269

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.38.383

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3788823

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B2F256-9E24-A52A-E6A7-FAE4FE6CAA51

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Stiriini
status

 

Stiriini 

1823 R Plagiomimicus spumosum (Grote, 1874) M Jul  – L Jul – – G T: Poole (1995)

L: Bowman (1951), Hooper (1991b), Poole (1995)

C: UASM

1824 * R Plagiomimicus expallidus Grote, 1883 L Jul  – E Sep – – G T: Poole (1995)

L: Bowman (1951), Poole (1995) C: CNC, UASM

1825 R Stiria rugifrons Grote, 1874 M Jul  – M Aug – – G T: Poole (1995)

L: Bowman (1951), Poole (1995) C: CNC, UASM

63.9. Oncocnemidinae 

Medium-sized (30–50 mm wingspan) moths, mostly gray or brown in color, some with bright yellow hindwings. Adults of most species are nocturnal, but a number of alpine and subalpine species are diurnal, and a number of steppe species may be active both day and night. Th e Oncocnemidinae  were treated as a tribe of the Cuculliinae  by Kitching and Rawlins (1999); Fibiger and Lafontaine (2005) have placed them in a separate subfamily, which is the treatment followed here. Th e subfamily Oncocnemidinae  is defined by the following characters: a long narrow vesica with a field of spines on the apical half, a long spinneret, and unusually long setae on the apex of the palps. The Oncocnemidinae  have a Holarctic distribution, but species richness is most notable in the arid parts of western North America. Th ere are about 200 described species in 10 genera in North America, the vast majority in the large genus Sympistis  . Thirty-nine described species in four genera are reported from AB. A number of species were described by Troubridge and Crabo (1999). Troubridge (2008) realigned the subfamily and transferred the genera Apharetra  , Hemistilbia  , Adita  , Lepipolys  , Homoncocnemis  , Homohadena  and Oncocnemis  to Sympistis  , and described 50 new North American species, three of which occur in Alberta. All species of Sympistis  were illustrated in color by Troubridge (2008). Most northern species were also treated and illustrated in color in Handfield (1999), and a few western species, including both adults and larvae, were treated and illustrated in color by Miller and Hammond (2000, 2003). The phylogenetic order used for the subfamily here follows Troubridge (2008).

1826 R Catabena lineolata Walker, 1865  M May – L Jul – – G T: Forbes (1954)

L: None C: CNC, UASM

1827 * R Pseudacontia crustaria (Morrison, 1875) L Jun  – – G L: None C: NFRC, UASM

1828 * R Pleromelloida conserta (Grote, 1881)  M ApriL – L Jun M b g L: None C: CNC, OLDS, UASM

1829 * R Pleromelloida bonuscula ( Smith, 1898)  L May – b G L: None C: DAM

1830 * R Pleromelloida cinerea (Smith, 1904) L Aug  – E Sep M – – L: None C: CNC, UASM

1831 * R Sympistis albifasciata (Hampson, 1906) Aug  – – G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC

1832 * R Sympistis saundersiana (Grote, 1876) L Aug  – E Sep – – g T: Forbes (1954)

L: None C: BIRD

1833 R Sympistis occata (Grote, 1875)  L May – M Jun – – G L: Bowman (1951) C: UASM

1834 * U Sympistis umbrifascia (Smith, 1894) Jul  – Aug M – – L: Crumb (1956) C: Unknown

1834.1 * P Sympistis balteata (Smith, 1902)  ? – – G

1834.2 * P Sympistis parvanigra (Blackmore, 1923) Jul  – Aug M – –

1835 R Sympistis viriditincta (Smith, 1894) L Aug  – – g T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: UASM

1836 R Sympistis stabilis (Smith, 1895) L Jun  – M Aug – b G L: Bowman (1951), Crumb (1956) C: CNC, OLDS,

PMAE, UASM

1837 R Sympistis badistriga (Grote, 1872) M Jul  – M Aug – B g T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951), Crumb (1956), Pohl et al.

(2004b) C: CNC, UASM

1837.1 * P Sympistis fifia (Dyar, 1904) Jun  – Jul M – –

1838 * R Sympistis dinalda ( Smith, 1908) E Jul  – E Aug – b G T: Forbes (1954)

L: [ Pohl et al. (2004b)] C: CNC, OLDS, PMAE,

UASM

1839 * R Sympistis glennyi (Grote, 1873) L Jul  – L Aug M – – L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1840 * R Sympistis lepipoloides (McDunnough, 1922) L Aug  – – G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC

1841 R Sympistis levis (Grote, 1880) L Aug  – E Sep – – G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1842 * R Sympistis insanina Troubridge, 2008 L Aug  – E Sep – – G T: Troubridge (2008)

L: [ Bowman (1951)], [ Hooper (1992)], Troubridge

(2008) C: CNC, UASM

1843 R Sympistis poliochroa (Hampson, 1906) E Aug  – M Sep M b G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, PMAE, UASM

1844 * R Sympistis mackiei (Barnes and Benjamin, 1924) M Aug  – M Sep – b G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, OLDS, UASM

1845 R Sympistis cibalis (Grote, 1880) E Aug  – L Sep m b G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, OLDS, UASM

1846 R Sympistis regina (Smith, 1902) L Aug  – E Sep – – G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1847 R Sympistis augustus (Harvey, 1875) M Aug  – L Sep – b G L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1848 * R Sympistis sandaraca ( Buckett and Bauer, 1967) L Aug  – L Sep M – – L: [ Bowman (1951)] C: CNC, UASM

1849 * R Sympistis pudorata (Smith, 1893) Jul M  – – L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC

1850 * R Sympistis amun Troubridge, 2008 L Jun  – M Jul M – – T: Troubridge (2008)

L: Troubridge (2008) C: CNC, UASM

1851 * R Sympistis chons Troubridge, 2008 L Jun  – M Jul m b G T: Troubridge (2008)

L: [ Bowman (1951)], Troubridge (2008) C: CNC, UASM

1852 * R Sympistis riparia (Morrison, 1875) M Jun  – L Jul – b G T: McDunnough (1941), Forbes (1954), Troubridge

and Crabo (1999)

L: Bowman (1951), Troubridge (2008) C: CNC,

OLDS, UASM

1853 * R Sympistis chionanthi (Smith, 1797) M Jul  – M Sep m b G T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, OLDS, UASM

1854 R Sympistis barnesii (Smith, 1899) Sep  – E Oct M – – L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1855 * R Sympistis chalybdis ( Troubridge and Crabo, 1999) E Aug  – L Sep M b – T: Troubridge and Crabo (1999)

L: Troubridge and Crabo (1999) C: UASM

1856 * R Sympistis piffardi (Walker, 1862) M Aug  – b g T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1857 * R H Sympistis funebris (Hübner, [1809]) L Jul  – E Aug M – – T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC

1858 * R Sympistis dentata (Grote, 1875) E Jul  – L Aug m B g T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1859 * R Sympistis anweileri Troubridge and Lafontaine, 2008 Jul  – Aug M – – T: Troubridge (2008)

L: [ Bowman (1951)], Troubridge (2008) C: CNC,

UASM

1860 * R Sympistis extremis (Smith, 1890) M Aug M  – – T: Troubridge and Crabo (1999)

L: None C: CNC, UASM

1861 * R Sympistis wilsoni Barnes and Benjamin, 1924 M Jul M  – – L: None C: CNC, G. J. Hilchie collection

1862 * R H Sympistis heliophila (Paykull, 1793) E Jul  – E Aug M B – L: None C: CNC, UASM

1863 * R H Sympistis nigrita (Boisduval, 1840) L Jun  – L Aug M – – T: Forbes (1954)

L: Bowman (1951) C: CNC, UASM

1863.1 * P Sympistis dayi (Grote, 1873) L Aug  m – G 1864 * R Sympistis pallidior (Barnes, 1928) M Jun  – M Jul – b G T: Troubridge and Crabo (1999)

L: [ Bowman (1951)] C: CNC, OLDS, UASM

63.10. Agaristinae  – foresters

Medium-sized (30–40 mm wingspan), brightly colored, predominantly diurnal moths with brightly colored larvae. Adults of many species are capable of sound production, which appears to be involved in courtship.

About 300 species of agaristines are known globally, mostly from tropical regions. Twenty-seven species in 12 genera occur in North America; three species are known in AB. Th e group has not been revised recently but is well defined phylogenetically (Kitching and Rawlins 1999).

1865 R Alypia langtoni Couper, 1865  M May – E Jul M B g L: Bowman (1951), Crumb (1956) C: CNC, NFRC, PMAE, UASM 1866 * R Alypia ridingsii Grote, 1865 Jun  – Jul M – – L: None C: UASM 1867 R Androloma maccullochii (Kirby, 1837) M Jun  – M Jul M b – L: Bowman (1951), Crumb (1956) C: CNC, PMAE, UASM

63.11. Condicinae 

Medium-sized (30–50 mm wingspan) moths. Th e subfamily is divided into two tribes, Condicini  and Leuconyctini  , both of which were defined in detail by Poole (1995). Both are defined mainly by characters of the male and female genitalia, as well as larval setal patterns. Larval host plants are mostly members of Asteraceae  .

This family is most diverse in the tropics. Th e North American fauna contains some 54 species in 11 genera; four species in three genera occur in AB. The subfamily has not been revised at the species level, and the large genus Condica  in particular is badly in need of revision.