Eurrhypini, Leraut & Luquet, 1983

Pohl, Greg, Anweiler, Gary, Schmidt, Christian & Kondla, Norbert, 2010, An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada, ZooKeys 38 (38), pp. 1-549: 156-157

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.38.383

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3789124

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B2F256-9FB7-A4BB-E6A7-FCF4FC0EAFFE

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Eurrhypini
status

 

Eurrhypini 

994 * R Mimoschinia rufofascialis (Stephens, 1834) Jun  – Jul m b G T: Munroe (1972b) L: Bowman (1951), Munroe (1972b) C: CNC, NFRC, OLDS, UASM

46.6. Evergestinae 

Small to medium-sized (10–35 mm wingspan) moths with relatively broad, usually triangular forewings and fan-shaped hindwings. Th ey are superficially similar to species in the subfamily Pyraustinae  ; no easily observed characters separate them from all of the other Crambidae  . Larvae are web makers that feed on Brassicaceae  and Capparidaceae  . Approximately 140 species of Evergestinae  are known worldwide, with the center of diversity in the Holarctic region. Th irty-seven species are known from North America; 11 of these are reported from AB. Th e group was revised by Munroe (1973a).

995 * R I? Evergestis pallidata (Hufnagel, 1767) Jun  – Jul m b g Purple-backed Cabbageworm T: Munroe (1973a) L: Bowman (1951), Munroe (1973a), Pohl et al. (2004b) C: CNC, NFRC, PMAE, UASM

996 R Evergestis simulatilis (Grote, 1880) Jul M B  – T: Munroe (1973a) L: Bowman (1951),? Munroe (1973a) C: CNC, NFRC, UASM

997 * R Evergestis vinctalis Barnes and McDunnough, 1914  May – – G

T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Bowman (1951) C: UASM

998 * R Evergestis obscuralis Barnes and McDunnough, 1914 Jun M  – – T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Bowman (1951), Munroe (1973a) C: CNC

999 * U Evergestis funalis (Grote, 1878) L Aug M  – – T: Munroe (1973a)

L: None C:?UASM

1000 R Evergestis subterminalis Barnes and McDunnough, 1914 Jul M  – – T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Bowman (1951), Munroe (1973a) C: CNC,

NFRC, UASM

1001 * R Prorasea simalis Grote, 1878 M Jul  – – G T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Kearfott (1905), Bowman (1951) C: UASM

1002 R Prorasea praeia (Dyar, 1917)  May – Jun M – G T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Munroe (1973a) C: CNC

1003 R Cylindrifrons succandidalis (Hulst, 1886) Jul  – – G T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Bowman (1951) C: NFRC, UASM

1004 R Orenaia trivialis Barnes and McDunnough, 1914 Jul M  – – T: Munroe (1973a)

L: Munroe (1973a) C: CNC

1005 * R Orenaia alticolalis (Barnes and McDunnough, 1914) L Jun M  – – T: Munroe (1973a)

L:? Munroe (1973a) C: CNC, NFRC

46.7. Pyraustinae 

A large group of mostly small to medium-sized (most 10–35 mm wingspan, with a few species up to 60 mm) moths with broad, triangular forewings and fan-shaped hindwings. Most species have long narrow bodies, with the abdomen usually extending beyond the anal angles of the hindwings. Larvae of most species are leaf webbers or stem and fruit borers; a number of species are important crop pests, including the European Corn Borer ( Ostrinia nubilalis  ).

Approximately 7400 species of Pyraustinae  are known from all regions of the world. The center of diversity is in temperate and tropical Asia. Th ree hundred and sixty-nine species are known in North America; 49 of these are reported in AB. The Pyraustine tribe Pyraustini  was revised by Munroe (1976a, 1976b). The remaining North American species are placed in the tribe Spilomelini  . Th e higher taxonomy of the Spilomelini  was revised by Munroe et al. (1995), which is followed here. The Spi- lomelini is in need of species-level revision, but some genera have been given modern treatment by Munroe (1952, 1955, 1956a, 1956b, 1956c, 1966, 1973b).