Mortoniella froehlichi, Blahnik & Holzenthal, 2011

Blahnik, Roger J. & Holzenthal, Ralph W., 2011, Revision of the austral South American species of Mortoniella (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae: Protoptilinae) 2851, Zootaxa 2851 (1), pp. 1-75: 55-58

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.2851.1.1

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6485658

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03BE8797-0065-FF8D-98B1-FA67FE32C5E7

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Mortoniella froehlichi
status

new species

Mortoniella froehlichi   , new species

Figs. 28 View FIGURE 28 , 31 View FIGURES 30–32 , 40 View FIGURES 38–40

This is the most distinctive of the 3 new species of the M. velasquezi   group from Brazil and unlikely to be confused because of its elongate, spine-like endophallic spines.

Adult. Length of forewing: male 2.5–2.9, female 2.6–3.3 mm. Forewing with forks I, II, and III present, hind wing with fork II only. Spur formula 0:3:4. Overall color dark brown. Legs brown, tibial spurs somewhat darker in color, but not strongly contrasting with legs, apices of tarsi whitish. Wing bar at anastamosis marked with white, contrasting setae.

Male genitalia. Ventral process of segment VI posteriorly projecting, elongate, narrow, length more than 2 times width at base ( Fig. 28E View FIGURE 28 ). Segment IX moderately rounded anterolaterally, length greatest in ventral 1/2, posterolateral margin nearly linear; segment deeply excised dorsomesally and ventromesally, forming lateral lobes, lobes separated dorsomesally by about 1/2 width of segment. Tergum X moderate in length, simple in structure, with deep, broad, U-shaped mesal excision; apical lobes, as viewed laterally, distinctly projecting, rounded to subacute apically. Inferior appendages almost completely fused to phallic ensemble, basally with short, setose, anteriorly-directed lobes, apically with elongate narrow lobes. Mesal pockets of fused inferior appendages very bulbously enlarged, with elongate, spine-like, posteriorly-directed apicoventral projections. Paramere appendages very narrow, elongate, slightly dorsally curved, about as long as dorsal phallic spine. Phallotheca very short; ventral rod-like appendages elongate, with widely flared apices. Dorsal phallic spine, as viewed dorsally, broad in middle, gradually narrowed and rounded apically; as viewed laterally, relatively narrow, sharply upturned at about apical 1/3rd. Phallicata with lightly sclerotized, slightly scabrous, rounded lateral lobes. Endophallic membrane relatively simple in structure, dorsally with small, rounded sclerite, apparently articulating with ventral margin of dorsal phallic spine; laterally, on either side, with very prominent, sclerotized, anteriorly-directed spine-like processes.

Holotype male: BRAZIL: Rio de Janeiro: Parati, Riacho Perequê-açu, Sitio Cachoeira Grande , 23°13'14"S, 044°47'24"W, 120 m, 25.ix.2002, Blahnik, Prather, Melo, Froehlich & Silva ( UMSP000086573 View Materials ) (pinned) ( MZUSP). GoogleMaps  

Paratypes: BRAZIL: Rio de Janeiro: same locality and date as holotype — 13 males, 12 females (pinned) ( MZUSP, UMSP, NMNH)   , 12 males, 2 females (alcohol) ( UMSP)   ; Parati, trib. to Riacho Perequê-açu , 23°12'50"S, 044°47'29"W, 190 m, 26.ix.2002, Blahnik, Prather, Melo, Froehlich & Silva — 3 males, 7 females (pinned), 9 males, 6 females (alcohol) ( UMSP) GoogleMaps   ; Parati, Riacho Perequê-açu , 23°13'27"S, 044°46'09"W, 30 m, 24.ix.2002, Blahnik, Prather, Melo, Froehlich & Silva — 9 males, 3 females (pinned) ( UMSP) GoogleMaps   , 3 males, 1 female (alcohol) ( MZUSP) GoogleMaps   ; Parque Estadual Intervales, Rio do Carmo , 24°18'59"S, 048°25'15"W, 560 m, 29.ix.2002, Blahnik, Prather, Melo & Calor — 3 males, 3 females (pinned) ( UMSP) GoogleMaps   .

Etymology. We take great pleasure in naming this species for Dr. Claudio Froehlich, both in recognition of his long career of working with aquatic insects in Brazil and also for his personal assistance during our collecting efforts in the country.

MZUSP

Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo

UMSP

University of Minnesota Insect Collection

NMNH

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History