Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Travassos)

Panti-May, Jesús Alonso, Digiani, María Celina, Palomo-Arjona, Eduardo Emir, Gurubel-González, Yessica Margely, Navone, Graciela T., Machain-Williams, Carlos, Hernández-Betancourt, Silvia F. & Robles, María Del Rosario, 2018, A checklist of the helminth parasites of sympatric rodents from two Mayan villages in Yucatán, México, Zootaxa 4403 (3), pp. 495-512: 503-504

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4403.3.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:171E79AE-35AF-48B1-B1CA-7A2D2F3F488F

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03CE87A4-D302-FFCC-EF90-9B72FD7522AF

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Travassos)
status

 

Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Travassos)  

(= Heligmosomum braziliense Travassos   ; = Heligmosomum muris Yokogawa   )

Site of infection: Small intestine

Host: Rattus rattus  

Locality: Paraíso

Prevalence and mean intensity (range): 14.3% (1/7) and 37 (37)

Specimens deposited: MLP-He 7433 and CNHE 10712

Comments: The specimens collected in this study exhibited characteristics described by Yokogawa (1920) and Haley (1961), i.e. 14 cuticular ridges in the synlophe at midbody; asymmetrical bursa with right lobe longer than left, with pattern of type 1-4; in right lobe, ray 2 long and slender, rays 3 and 6 short and slender, rays 4 and 5 thick contiguous and diverging in distal portion; in left lobe, rays 2 to 5 long and slender, ray 6 thick and curved towards dorsal lobe; both rays 8 short and slender; short dorsal ray; rays 9 arising at same level of division of the dorsal ray; and spicules 565–618 long.

In México, N. brasiliensis   has been recorded from M. musculus   in Tabasco ( Cigarroa-Toledo et al. 2017), R. rattus   in Hidalgo (Pulido-Flores et al. 2005) and Tabasco ( Cigarroa-Toledo et al. 2017), and R. norvegicus   in Michoacán (Hierro-Huerta 1992) and Tabasco ( Cigarroa-Toledo et al. 2017).

In Yucatán, this species has been previously reported from M. musculus   and R. rattus   in three localities in Mérida and Opichén (Panti-May et al. 2015, 2017).