Hylinae,

Duellman, William E., Marion, Angela B. & Hedges, Blair, 2016, Phylogenetics, classification, and biogeography of the treefrogs (Amphibia: Anura: Arboranae), Zootaxa 4104 (1), pp. 1-109: 56-57

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4104.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D598E724-C9E4-4BBA-B25D-511300A47B1D

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03EA87A5-FF9E-1211-F398-8BBA3165F2F3

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Hylinae
status

 

Holarctic Hylinae 

The predominantly Eurasian Hyla  split from the predominantly North American Dryophytes in the Miocene, 22.6 Mya, with the former genus dispersing throughout Eurasia. Subsequent aridification of much of central Asia resulted there in a western clade of eight species of Hyla  in what is now Europe and southwestern Asia and a farremoved eastern clade in temperate and subtropical southeastern Asia.

Also in the mid-Miocene 15.4 (13.6–17.3) Mya, the clade that remained in North America differentiated genetically, and evolved into what is recognized as Dryophytes, which occurs throughout temperate eastern North America. Our analysis shows that a stock of Dryophytes dispersed westward across the Bering Land Bridge to Asia in the late Miocene 8.7 (6.6–10.9) Mya. This stock differentiated into three species in eastern Asia (including Japan), the Dryophytes immaculatus Group. The closest relatives of this group, the Dryophytes eximius Group, principally inhabited the pine forests from southwestern United States to Guatemala.

Thus there were two dispersals of hylid frogs across the Bering Land Bridge; temporally these are: (1) Hyla  from east to west, and (2) Dryophytes from west to east. In contrast to their Middle American relatives, no lineage of hylines in North America inhabited streams, a habitat that is plentiful in the Appalachian, Rocky, and Sierra  Nevada mountain ranges, among others.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Amphibia

Order

Anura

Family

Hylidae