Ecnomiohyla Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005,

Duellman, William E., Marion, Angela B. & Hedges, Blair, 2016, Phylogenetics, classification, and biogeography of the treefrogs (Amphibia: Anura: Arboranae), Zootaxa 4104 (1), pp. 1-109: 21

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4104.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D598E724-C9E4-4BBA-B25D-511300A47B1D

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03EA87A5-FFBD-123D-F398-8E41367EF43A

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Ecnomiohyla Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005
status

 

Ecnomiohyla Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005 

Ecnomiohyla Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005  : 100. Type species: Hypsiboas miliarius Cope, 1886  , by original designation.

Definition. Large treefrogs (SVL in males to 110 mm) with dermal fringes on the outer edges of the limbs, extensive webbing on the hands and feet, and an enlarged prepollex ( Fig. 7View FIGURE 7. A B). Tadpoles with a LTRF of 2 / 3 and developing in water in tree holes.

Content. Twelve species: Ecnomiohyla bailarina* Batista, Hertz, Mebert, Köhler, Lotzkat, Ponce  , and Vesely, echinata  * (Duellman), fimbrimembra  * (Taylor), miliaria (Cope)  , minera  (Wilson, McCranie, and Williams), phantasmagoria  * (Dunn), rabborum Mendelson, Savage, Griffith, Ross, Kubicki  , and Gagliardo, salvaje* (Wilson, McCranie, and Williams), sukia  * Savage and Kubicki, thysanota  * (Duellman), valancifer* (Firschein and Smith), and veraguensis  * Batista, Hertz, Mebert, Köhler, Lotzkat, Ponce, and Vesely.

Distribution. Southern Mexico through Central America to western Colombia and northwestern Ecuador.

Etymology. According to Faivovich et al. (2005: 100), “From the Greek, ecnomios, meaning marvelous, unusual …” The gender is feminine.

Remarks. Mendelson et al. (2008), Savage and Kubicki (2010), and Batista et al. (2014) have expanded our knowledge of this genus, which still contains species known only from their holotypes (e.g., Ecnomiohyla echinata  and E. thysanota  ). For more than half of a century, E. phantasmagoria  has been known only from the holotype from the Río Cauca in Colombia, but recently was discovered in the Provincia de Esmeraldas in Ecuador (Ortega- Andrade et al. 2010).

Our tree ( Fig. 4View FIGURE 4) shows Ecnomiohyla rabborum  as the sister species of E. malaria  + E. minera  . The most extensive molecular phylogenetic tree, based only on the 16 S rRNA mitochondrial gene, of Ecnomiohyla  contains six species ( Batista et al. 2014). In their maximum likelihood consensus tree, two well-supported clades are evident. One contains E. fimbrimembra  as the sister species of E. rabborum  + E. bailarina  ; the second clade has E. miliaria  as the sister species of E. sukia  + E. veraguensis  .

Mendelson et al. (2008) emphasized that the Amazonian “ Hyla tuberculosa  ” Boulenger is not a member of Ecnomiohyla  and should be designated incertae sedis. Savage and Kubicki (2010) regarded the placement of tuberculosa in Economiohyla  as problematic because it lacked the synapomorphic morphological characters, principally an enlarged prepollex with keratinous spines, of the genus. We await molecular data for this species but herein we consider “ Hyla tuberculosa  ” to be a member of the South American catch-all genus, Hypsiboas  .

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Amphibia

Order

Anura

Family

Hylidae

Loc

Ecnomiohyla Faivovich, Haddad, Garcia, Frost, Campbell, and Wheeler, 2005

Duellman, William E., Marion, Angela B. & Hedges, Blair 2016
2016
Loc

Ecnomiohyla

Faivovich 2005: 100
2005