Matsucoccus alabamae Morrison, 1939

Ahmed, Muhammad Z., Ray, Charles H., Moore, Matthew R. & Miller, Douglass R., 2020, The Matsucoccus Cockerell, 1909 of Florida (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Matsucoccidae): Potential pests of Florida pines, Insecta Mundi 2020 (810), pp. 1-31: 8-15

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4565418

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:803B5050-F60D-4E96-8199-7E100258A4C4

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4588708

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03F287F5-9004-0911-FF0A-FA61FB823583

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Matsucoccus alabamae Morrison, 1939
status

 

Matsucoccus alabamae Morrison, 1939  

( Fig. 6–7 View Figure 6 View Figure 7 )

Matsucoccus matsumurae (Kuwana)   ; Herbert 1921: 15; Morrison 1928: 3. misidentification ( Morrison 1939: 13). (in part; also see M. gallicolus   ).

Matsucoccus alabamae Morrison 1939: 2   . Accepted valid name.

Adult Female

( Fig. 6 View Figure 6 )

Diagnosis. Cicatrices usually in four rows, anterior row narrower than remaining rows; body setae all about same size; vulva present near posterior end of abdomen; fleshy setae present on distal four antennal segments.

Description. Body elongate, parallel sided, 4.0–6.9 (4.4–6.7) mm long, 1.8–2.2 (1.8–2.2) mm wide. Dorsum: Setae uncommon, inconspicuous, arranged in rows, of one size, 8–10 (7–11) µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts scattered over surface, uncommon on head and within rows of cicatrices; tubes sometimes slightly divergent. Cicatrices in four rows on segments III to VI, rarely with cicatrices in small numbers on segments II and/or VII; anterior row on segment III usually about half as wide as other rows; with 223–370 (95–511) cicatrices; largest 8–11 (9–14) µm in diameter.

Venter. Setae uncommon, arranged in rows, of one size 8–10 (7–11) µm long, over most of surface; longest seta anterior of hind coxae 10–16 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts arranged segmentally, uncommon on head, most abundant on margin; similar in size and shape as on dorsum. Multilocular pores in cluster surrounding vulva at, or near, abdominal apex; with 42–64 (44–88) pores; diameter of largest pore 8–11(11–15) µm. Thoracic spiracles without definite sclerotized rim on derm; posterior spiracle with largest diameter of atrium 32–49 (33–48) µm; with seven pairs of abdominal spiracles, normally with dermal orifice sclerotized, all equally sclerotized and about same size, diameter of sclerotized dermal orifice of first abdominal spiracle 13–20 (15–22) µm, of seventh spiracle 17–20 (14–17) µm. Legs large and conspicuous, with scale-like pattern on all segments except first tarsal segment; hind trochanter with one (rarely two) long seta, 7–11 (10–12) sensoria; femur 228–290 (274–309) µm long, with 12–18 (8–22) setae; tibia 220–255 (242–321) µm long, with 31–38 (25–41) setae; tarsus (both segments) 150–172 µm long, tarsal digitule undifferentiated; claw without denticle, with two conspicuous digitules, equal in size. Antennae nine segmented, 0.7–0.8 (0.7–0.8) mm long; apical four segments each with two enlarged setae; first segment 135–165 (131–168) µm long, 165–210 (148–226) µm wide, with 2–4 setae on ventral surface, 16–24 setae on dorsal surface; second segment 115–125 (111–136) µm long, 100–130 µm wide, with 4–9 setae on ventral surface, 6–10 setae on dorsal surface. Anterior apex of vulva lying under anterior apex of abdominal segment VIII on dorsum.

Remarks. For a comparison of this species with M. gallicolus   see the notes section of the latter. This species is very similar to M. banksianae Ray and Williams   , but the latter differs (characters in parentheses are of M. alabamae   ) by having 3, 4, or 5 rows of cicatrices (four rows), and occurs on Pinus banksiana Lamb.   in Minnesota (occurs on Pinus elliottii Engelm.   , P. taeda   L., and P. rigida Mill.   in the southeastern U.S.). The above description is based on 14 specimens from seven localities.

Third-instar Male

( Fig. 7 View Figure 7 )

Diagnosis. One size of seta on venter, setae anterior of metacoxae 8–11 µm long; with eight or fewer bilocular tubular ducts on dorsum of abdominal segment III; developing genitalia at posterior end of abdomen; abdominal spiracles usually similar in size; fleshy setae present on distal four antennal segments.

Description. Body elongate, parallel sided, 2.5–2.9 mm long, 0.9–1.2 mm wide. Dorsum: Setae uncommon, inconspicuous, arranged in rows, of one size, 8–12 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts scattered over surface, in segmental rows, associated with setal rows, arranged in longitudinal lines with lines present submedially, mediolaterally, and laterally, with six or seven ducts on abdominal segment III, tubes sometimes slightly divergent.

Venter. Setae uncommon, arranged in rows, of one size 8–10 µm long, over most of surface; longest seta anterior of hind coxae 10–16 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts uncommon on head and medial areas of thorax, most abundant on margin, arranged in longitudinal lines, present submedially and laterally; similar in size and shape as on dorsum. Thoracic spiracles without definite sclerotized rim on derm; posterior thoracic spiracle with largest diameter of atrium 24–29 µm; with seven pairs of abdominal spiracles, normally with dermal orifice sclerotized, all equally sclerotized and about same size, diameter of sclerotized rim of dermal orifice of first abdominal spiracle 10–15 µm, of seventh spiracle 10–11 µm. Legs large and conspicuous, with scale-like pattern on all segments except first tarsal segment; hind leg with trochanter with one long seta, 8–13 sensoria; femur 170–195 µm long, with 16–21 setae; tibia 170–205 µm long, with 27–41 setae; tarsus (both segments) 100–120 µm long, tarsal digitule undifferentiated; claw without denticle, with two conspicuous digitules, equal in size. Antennae nine segmented, 0.5–0.8 mm long; apical four segments each with two enlarged setae; first segment 110–120 µm long, 110–160 µm wide, with 0–4 setae on ventral surface, 12–23 setae on dorsal surface; second segment 75–90 µm long, 95–125 µm wide, with 4–6 setae on ventral surface, 3–6 setae on dorsal surface, three or four sensilla on dorsal surface. Developing genitalia near posterior end of body.

Type material. Type data: USA: Alabama, Calhoun, on Pinus   sp., March 16 and 31, April 21, 1902; collected by A.M. Troyer. Syntypes, female and first instar. Because Morrison (1939) did not specifically mention a holotype in the original description, the lectotype, designated here, is the single mounted adult female from the syntype series mounted on a slide and labeled as follows: left label: “9582 Matsucoccus   / alabamae/ Holotype / On pine/ Calhoun, Ala./ March 16, 1902 ” right label “ Matsucoccus   / alabamae   / Morrison/ lectotype / desig. by Ahmed et al. 2020 ” (deposited at USNM). In addition, there are 14 paralectotypes. Type depositories: AUMNH, UCDC, USNM. We have examined the lectotype and several of the paralectotypes deposited in AUMNH and USNM.

Remarks. For a comparison of M. alabamae   with M. krystalae   see the notes section of the latter. The above description is based on seven third-instar males from the following locality: Lee County, Auburn, Alabama, March 1, 1979, on Pinus   sp., C.H. Ray and I. Daniels, deposited in AUMNH.

Life history. The following information is from Ray (1982) based on observations made in Auburn, Alabama from November 1978 to April 1981. This species overwinters in the second-instar cyst beneath bark scales on the trunk of the host. In March, the third-instar males emerge from cysts, settle beneath bark scales and produce a waxy sac in which they molt to the fourth-instar pupa. Adult males emerge and begin to actively seek out females. Adult females emerge from the cyst, move to the outer surfaces of the tree trunk or between the edges of bark scales and extend the posterior end of their abdomen as far from the trunk as possible. Adult males run rapidly up and down the trunk and orient to the posterior apex of the female and copulate. After copulation is complete, adult females crawl beneath loose bark flakes, near a scar, or at the base of a branch and produce a waxy ovisac in which 501– 860 eggs are laid. Copulation is necessary for oviposition: confined females do not produce eggs. As females deposit eggs, their bodies contract and fold so that when all eggs are deposited, the females are reduced to less than 1/3 of their original size.

Material examined. Alachua Co., Gainesville, behind Division of Plant Industry , ( Long. 29.634987, Lat. −82.371138) September 6, 2018, on Pinus elliottii, M. Ahmed   (dead mummy) (2018-4724) 3 ad. ♀   ; Broward Co., Ft. Lauderdale ( Lat. 26.20512, Long. −80.1698), April 26, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2018-2743) 2 ad. ♀   ; Duval Co., Jacksonville, Port of Jacksonville , Florida 9A, ( Lat. 30.39461, Long. −81.58198), December 7, 2017, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), M. Lara, (2018-1002) 1 ad. ♀   ; Jacksonville, Port of Jacksonville , November 1, 2017, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), M. Lara, (2018-609) 1 ad. ♀ [we are unable to authenticate the location of these records; the official GPS coordinates of the closest trap are Lat. 30.394678, Long. −81.562037]   ; Franklin Co., Lanark Village , January 31, 2018, on Pinus   sp., S. Halbert, M. Ahmed, D. Miller (dead mummy) (2018-343) 5 ad. ♀   ; Highlands Co., Archbald Research Station , April 28, 1975, on Pinus elliottii, R. Denno, J. Davidson, D. Miller   5 ad. ♀ ( USNM)   ; Liberty Co., US 27 N, January 31, 2018, on Pinus   sp., S. Halbert, M. Ahmed, D. Miller (dead mummy) (2018-346) 1 ad. ♀   ; Miami-Dade Co., Miami , December 25, 1978, on Pinus elliottii, C. Ray   6ad. ♀ ( AUMNH)   ; Miami-Dade Co., Miami , July 20, 1980, on Pinus elliottii, C. Ray   2 ad. ♀ ( AUMNH)   ; Okaloosa Co., Niceville , February 17, 1979, on Pinus elliottii, C. Ray   8 ad. ♀ ( AUMNH)   ; Palm Beach Co., Magnolia Park ( Lat. 26.76042, Long. −80.07526), November 19, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2019-181) 1 ad. ♀   ; Wakulla Co., Apalachicola National Forest , January 16, 1997, on Pinus palustris, W. Tschinkel   (97-0195) 8 second instar cysts ( Fig. 8 View Figure 8 )   .

Distribution outside of Florida. Matsucoccus alabamae   was known only from Alabama but Ray (1982) reported it from Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee in his unpublished dissertation. Recently Ahmed and Miller (2020) reported it from Florida and confirm the Florida occurrence data herein. A new record for Virginia is provided by DRM follows: Bayville Farms Park, Virginia Beach, Virginia December 24, 2019, under bark of Pinus taeda, D. R. Miller   (2020-25).

Damage. This species has not been implicated in causing economic damage.

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

UCDC

R. M. Bohart Museum of Entomology

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hemiptera

Family

Margarodidae

Genus

Matsucoccus

Loc

Matsucoccus alabamae Morrison, 1939

Ahmed, Muhammad Z., Ray, Charles H., Moore, Matthew R. & Miller, Douglass R. 2020
2020
Loc

Matsucoccus alabamae

Morrison H. 1939: 2
1939
Loc

Matsucoccus matsumurae (Kuwana)

Morrison H. 1939: 13
Morrison H. 1928: 3
Herbert FB 1921: 15
1921