Matsucoccus krystalae Ahmed and Miller

Ahmed, Muhammad Z., Ray, Charles H., Moore, Matthew R. & Miller, Douglass R., 2020, The Matsucoccus Cockerell, 1909 of Florida (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Matsucoccidae): Potential pests of Florida pines, Insecta Mundi 2020 (810), pp. 1-31: 22-28

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4565418

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:803B5050-F60D-4E96-8199-7E100258A4C4

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4588712

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03F287F5-901A-091C-FF0A-FC50FB763202

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Matsucoccus krystalae Ahmed and Miller
status

new species

Matsucoccus krystalae Ahmed and Miller   , new species

( Fig. 11–12 View Figure 11 View Figure 12 )

Matsucoccus gallicolus Morrison 1939: 12   (in part). Possible misidentification of paratype specimens taken from herbarium specimens from Pinus glabra Walter, Chattahoochee   , Florida, November, unknown date, A. H. Curtiss.

Adult Female

( Fig. 11 View Figure 11 )

Diagnosis. Cicatrices numbering more than 400, normally present on metathorax to segment VI, occasionally absent from metathorax; cicatrices present near body margin on one or more posterior abdominal segments; with more than 35 multilocular pores; body setae of two distinct sizes; fleshy setae present on distal four antennal segments.

Description. Body elongate, parallel sided, 3.1–5.9 mm long, 1.4–2.2 mm wide. Dorsum: Setae uncommon, inconspicuous, arranged in rows, of one size, 8–11 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts scattered over surface, uncommon on head and within rows of cicatrices; tubes usually slightly divergent. Cicatrices on metathorax (some specimens without or with only one or two) or segment I to segment VI; some segments with cicatrices present near body margin; some anterior segments with separate rows on anterior and posterior sections, anterior rows usually with fewer cicatrices; totaling 437–900; largest 6–12 µm in diameter.

Venter. Setae uncommon, arranged in rows, of two sizes, smaller setae 8–11 µm long, over most of surface; longest seta anterior of hind coxae 30–55 µm long, longer setae also present in medial areas of abdominal segments. Bilocular tubular ducts arranged segmentally, uncommon on head, most abundant on margin; similar in size and shape as on dorsum or slightly smaller. Multilocular pores in cluster around vulva, many specimens with ventral vulva located beneath segments IV, V or VI; with 36–72 multilocular pores; diameter of largest pore 10–12 µm. Thoracic spiracles without definite sclerotized rim on derm or with narrow band of sclerotization; posterior spiracle with largest diameter of atrium 28–50 µm; with seven pairs of abdominal spiracles, normally with dermal orifice sclerotized, more weakly sclerotized posteriorly, sometimes decreasing in size posteriorly, diameter of dermal orifice of first abdominal spiracle 17–25 µm, of seventh spiracle 8–12 µm. Legs large and conspicuous, with scale-like pattern on all segments except first tarsal segment; hind leg with trochanter with one long seta, 9–14 sensoria; femur 228–365 µm long, with 16–29 setae; tibia 228–285 µm long, with 21–47 setae; tarsus (both segments) 155–180 µm long, tarsal digitule undifferentiated; claw without denticle, with two conspicuous digitules, equal in size. Antennae nine segmented, 0.6–0.8 mm long; apical four segments each with two enlarged setae; first segment 145–205 µm long, 160–200 µm wide, with 7–10 setae on ventral surface, 19–26 setae on dorsal surface; second segment 85–130 µm long, 110–130 µm wide, with 5–8 setae on ventral surface, 6–7 setae on dorsal surface.

Remarks. Adult females of M. krystalae   can be separated from M. gallicolus   (characters in parentheses are of M. gallicolus   ) as follows: 437–900 cicatrices (170–378 cicatrices); cicatrices often present on metathorax (not on metathorax); cicatrices present near body margin on one or more posterior abdominal segments (not present near body margin); with 36–72 multilocular pores (20–32 multilocular pores). Adult females of M. krystalae   can be separated from M. alabamae   (characters in parentheses are of M. krystalae   ) as follows: Cicatrices present from abdominal segment III to VI (metathorax or segment I to segment VI); setae anterior of hind coxae 10–16 µm long (18–55 µm long); abdominal spiracles approximately same size (7 th abdominal spiracle normally smaller than 1 st abdominal spiracle); 2–4 setae on venter of first antennal segment (5–9); 7–18 setae on hind femur (16–29). Adult females of M. krystalae   also are similar to M. apachecae Ray and Williams   from Arizona but differ from the latter (characters in parentheses are of M. krystalae   ) by having from 21–45 cicatrices (437–900 cicatrices) present in the medial area of the dorsum (medial, mediolateral, and lateral areas).

The above description is based on 28 adult females from seven localities.

Third-instar Male

( Fig. 12 View Figure 12 )

Diagnosis. Two sizes of setae on venter, setae anterior of metacoxae about 30 µm long, marginal setae about 12 µm long; with 10 or more bilocular tubular ducts on dorsum of abdominal segment III; abdominal spiracles usually decreasing in size posteriorly; fleshy setae present on distal four antennal segments.

Description. Body elongate, parallel sided, 2.1–2.8 mm long, 1.0–1.2 mm wide. Dorsum: Setae uncommon, inconspicuous, arranged in rows, of one size, 9–11 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts scattered over surface, in segmental rows, associated with setal rows, not arranged in longitudinal lines; with 10 or more ducts on abdominal segment III, tubes sometimes slightly divergent.

Venter. Setae uncommon, arranged in rows, of two sizes, larger 20–30 µm long, smaller 6–12 µm long; longest seta anterior of hind coxae 20–36 µm long. Bilocular tubular ducts uncommon on head and medial areas of thorax, most abundant on margin, arranged in longitudinal lines, present submedially and laterally; similar in size and shape as on dorsum. Thoracic spiracles without definite sclerotized rim on derm; posterior thoracic spiracle with largest diameter of atrium 25–30 µm; with seven pairs of abdominal spiracles, normally with dermal orifice sclerotized, all equally sclerotized, normally decreasing in size posteriorly, diameter of sclerotized rim of dermal orifice of first abdominal spiracle 14–18 µm, of seventh spiracle 8–11 µm. Legs large and conspicuous, with scale-like pattern on all segments except first tarsal segment; hind leg with trochanter with one long seta, 8–12 sensoria; femur 185–260 µm long, with 18–24 setae; tibia 185–240 µm long, with 37–58 setae; tarsus (both segments) 125–135 µm long, tarsal digitule undifferentiated; claw without denticle, with two conspicuous digitules, equal in size. Antennae nine segmented, 0.6–0.8 mm long; apical four segments each with two enlarged setae; first segment 120–195 µm long, 125–175 µm wide, with 1–8 setae on ventral surface, 12–18 setae on dorsal surface; second segment 85–95 µm long, 100–120 µm wide, with 4–7 setae on ventral surface, 4–6 setae on dorsal surface, 2–7 sensilla on dorsal surface. Ventral developing genitalia located under dorsal segment IV, V, VI, or VII.

Remarks. Third-instar males of M. krystalae   can be separated from M. alabamae   (characters in parentheses are of M. krystalae   ) as follows: setae anterior of hind coxae 10–16 µm long (20–36 µm long); abdominal spiracles approximately same size (7 th abdominal spiracle normally smaller than 1 st abdominal spiracle); eight or fewer bilocular tubular ducts on dorsum of abdominal segment III (10 or more).

The above description is based on 118 third-instar males from 14 localities.

Type material. Holotype adult female mounted singly on a slide; left label “ Holotype / Hemiptera   / Matsucoccidae   / Matsucoccus krystalae   / Ahmed and Miller/Det. MZAhmed, 2018/ E-2018-1367” right label “ USA, Florida: St Lucie Co. /Fort Pierce/ 2001 Rock Rd/ 28 FEB 2018 / E-2018-1367-1” Deposited in FSCA. In addition, there are 145 paratypes deposited in the following collections: AUMNH, CSCA, NHMUK, UCDC, USNM.  

Etymology. The species epithet krystalae   is named in honor of Krystal Ashman who first noticed Matsucoccus   specimens in Lindgren funnel trap samples and who has continued to collect specimens, providing clues to the life history of the species. We are most grateful for her efforts.

Material examined. All specimens are considered paratypes. Except the two slides from Chattahoochee. Alachua Co., Leveda Brown Environmental Park , Gainesville, October 16, 2018 (Lat. 29.70818, Long. −82.26424), on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap, baited with ethanol and Alpha-Pinene lures), R. Leahy and B. Alford (2018-6381) 1 ad. ♀   ; Brevard Co., Melbourne , October 17, 2017, on Pinus ellottii   , (Lindgren trap), B. Saunders (2018-231) 1 ad. ♀   ; Titusville , February 26 and March 30, 2018, April 30, 2018 (Lat. 28.49972, Long. −80.78294), on Quercus   sp., (Lindgren trap baited with ethanol, Alpha-Pinene, and Monochamol lures), B. Saunders (2018−877, 2018- 2279, 2018-3118) 8 3 rd ♂ [the exact location and host are questionable since there is a discrepancy in the correct GPS coordinates; the official location was Lat. 28.500785, Long. −80.781750]   ; Broward Co.: Ft. Lauderdale ( Lat. 26.20512, Long. −80.1698), March 23, 2018 and April 26, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2018- 1688, 2018-2743) 6 3 rd ♂   ; Ft. Lauderdale , Port Everglades Airport , (Lat. 26.07176, Long. −80.13222) May 29, 2019, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2019-4471) 1 3 rd ♂   ; Pompano Beach , (Lat. 26.26933, Long. −80.15826) March 23, 2018, April 26, 2018, November 19, 2018, December 18, 2018, April 30, 2019, March 28, 2019, May 29, 2019, April 24, 2020, on Pinus elliottii   (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2018-1659, 2018-2744, 2019-139, 2019- 401, 2019-3259, 2019-3878 and 2020-1594) 55 3 rd ♂, 14 ad. ♀   ; Duval Co., Baldwin , Highway 217, Yellow Water Rd. ( Lat. 30.27885, Long. −81.97732), December 4, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap, baited with ethanol and Alpha-Pinene lures), M. Byron and R. Leahy, (2019-249), 1 3 rd ♂   ; Jacksonville (Lat. 30.31203, Long. −81.86378), October 16, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap, baited with ethanol, Alpha-Pinene, and Monochamol lures), M. Echols, (2018-6376), 1 3 rd ♂   ; Gadsen Co., Chattahoochee , November, day and year unknown sometime before 1939, on Pinus glabra, A.H. Curtis   ( USNH # 941030 & HNYGB # 2656) 8 cysts, collected from pressed herbarium specimens by Louise Russell ( USNM)   ; Hillsborough Co., MacDill Air Force Base , Tampa , ( Lat. 27.8383, Long. −82.5026), October 4, 2017, October 2, 2018, October 16, 2018, October 27, 2018, on Pinus   sp. P. Barker, (Lindgren trap) (2018-324, 2018-6211, 2018-1961, 2018-6378) 8 3 rd ♂, 2 ad. ♀   ; Miami-Dade Co., Medley , ( Lat. 25.85173, Long. −80.32365) February 23, 2018, March 19, 2018, April 27, 2018, April 30, 2018, November 20, 2018, December 18, 2018, on Pinus elliotti   (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2018-1311, 2018-1587, 2018-2720, 2019- 182, 2019-402) 15 3 rd ♂, 1 ad. ♀   ; Nassau Co., Fort Clinch State Park ( Lat. 30.6942, Long. −81.4389), March 28, 2018, September 28, 2018, March 12, 2019, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap, baited with ethanol and Alapha-Pinene lures), R. Leahy (2018-1689, 2018-6018, 2019-2553) 4 3 rd ♂   ; Orange Co., Moss Park , Orlando ( Lat. 28.37468, Long. −81.18946), October 3, 2011, on Pinus elliotti, M. Weiss   (Lindgren trap) (2011-9369) 3 3 rd ♂   ; Palm Beach Co., Jupiter ( Lat. 26.92833, Long. −80.18029), February 25, 2019, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), J. Farnum (2019- 1993) 1 3 rd ♂   ; Palm Beach Co., Jupiter , Jupiter Country Club ( Lat. 26.645895, Long. −80.430269), April 5, 2018, on Pinus elliottii, J. Johnson   , submitted by Lyle Buss, (2018-1988) 2 cysts   ; St. Lucie Co., Fort Pierce ( Lat. 27.42909, Long. −80.40859), February 28, 2018, March 20 and 30, 2018, July 30, 2018, on Pinus elliottii   ., B. Saunders (Lindgren trap) (2018-1367, 2018-2275, 2018-3173, and 2018-4864), 14 3 rd ♂, 7 ad. ♀   ; Volusia Co., Daytona Beach ( Lat. 29.20743, Long. −81.01269), January 8, 2018 and May 10, 2018, on Pinus   sp., P. Coffey (2018-471 and 2018- 3047) 2 3 rd ♂   ; Daytona Beach (Lat. 29.207554, Long. −81.012311), June 27, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), P. Coffey (2018-4028) 2 ad. ♀   ; Daytona Beach (Lat. 29.22651, Long. −81.0242), October 10, 2018, on Pinus   sp., (Lindgren trap), P. Coffey (2018-6210) 1 3 rd ♂   .

Life history. Little is known about the life cycle of this species. Most of the biological data were gathered from Lindgren funnel traps. Adult females were collected in traps from Brevard Co., Melbourne, October; Broward Co., Pompano Beach, April, November and December; Hillsborough Co., Tampa, October; in St. Lucie Co., Fort Pierce, February, March, April and July; St. Lucie Co., in Daytona Beach, June; Alachua Co., Gainesville, October; Miami-Dade Co., Medley, March. Similar results were discovered with third-instar males: Brevard Co., Titusville, February, March and April; Broward Co., Ft. Lauderdale, March and April; Broward Co., Pompano Beach, March, April, November and December; Duval Co., Baldwin, December; Duval Co., Jacksonville, October; Hillsborough Co., MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, October; Miami-Dade Co., Medley, February, April, November, December; Nassau Co., Fort Clinch State Park, March, September; Orange Co., Moss Park, Orlando October; Palm Beach Co., Jupiter, February: St. Lucie Co., Fort Pierce, February and March; Volusia Co., Daytona Beach January, May, June and October. Since specimens were active during the month when they were collected, and since active third-instar males and adult females were taken in every month but August, it appears that the species has more than a single generation each year. One collection of cysts was recorded in Palm Beach County, Jupiter, on the small branches of Pinus elliottii   , April 5, 2018 ( Figure 13 View Figure 13 ). The cysts were deeply imbedded in the current year’s growth but there was no indication of swelling or galling; the only indication that a cyst was present under the bark was a small hole with the shiny black integument of the cyst showing through ( Figure 13 View Figure 13 ). These pines were showing serious die back, but it appears that this was caused by a fungal disease and not the Matusucoccus infestation. However, because of the cryptic nature of this insect it is possible that they may have been a contributing factor.

Other Species

It is worth mentioning that M. macrocicatrices   has been collected in eastern North America from Canada to Georgia and is often associated with Septobasidium pinicola Snell   on Pinus strobus   L. ( Mech et al. 2013). It can be distinguished from the other species in Florida by having (characters of M. alabamae   , M. gallicolus   , and M. krystalae   are given in parentheses) enlarged setae on the last five antennal segments (four antennal segments) and by cicatrices that are greater than 15 microns in diameter (less than 15 microns). Because M. macrocicatrices   has

only been reported on P. strobus   and because Florida is outside the natural range of this host it is unlikely that this Matsucoccus   species will be found in Florida unless the tree is planted in an ornamental setting.

FSCA

Florida State Collection of Arthropods, The Museum of Entomology

CSCA

California State Collection of Arthropods

NHMUK

Natural History Museum, London

UCDC

R. M. Bohart Museum of Entomology

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

R

Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hemiptera

Family

Margarodidae

Genus

Matsucoccus

Loc

Matsucoccus krystalae Ahmed and Miller

Ahmed, Muhammad Z., Ray, Charles H., Moore, Matthew R. & Miller, Douglass R. 2020
2020
Loc

Matsucoccus gallicolus

Morrison H. 1939: 12
1939