Triasaria washingtonensis, Shear, 2020

Shear, William A., 2020, The millipede family Striariidae Bollman, 1893: I. Introduction to the family, synonymy of Vaferaria Causey with Amplaria Chamberlin, the new subfamily Trisariinae, the new genus Trisaria, and three new species (Diplopoda, Chordeumatida, Striarioidea), Zootaxa 4758 (2), pp. 275-295: 284-288

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4758.2.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:2539ABCC-161E-44B2-BB2C-C949B1A7C94D

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3812349

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0F4F0D64-253D-FFA0-FF69-F893FCC2BFF8

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Triasaria washingtonensis
status

new species

Triasaria washingtonensis   , new species

Figs. 29–47 View FIGURES 26–31 View FIGURES 32–35 View FIGURES 36–38 View FIGURES 40, 41 View FIGURE 42 View FIGURES 43–47

Types: Male holotype, 2 male and 7 female paratypes from Swede Park, residence at 369 Loop Road, Grays River, 50’ asl, N46°18.499’, W123°40.128’, Whahiakum Co., Washington, collected 17 January 2004 by W. Leonard, C. Richart and R. Pyle, deposited in Burke Memorial Museum, University of Washington   , Seattle, Washington.

Etymology: The species epithet refers to the relatively wide occurrence of the species in southwestern Washington.

Diagnosis: Distinct from the other two species of Trisaria   in details of the gonopods ( Figs. 30–35 View FIGURES 26–31 View FIGURES 32–35 ). The anterior branch of the median angiocoxite (mac1, Figs. 30 View FIGURES 26–31 , 32 View FIGURES 32–35 ) is short, blunt, and two-lobed. The posterior branch a sinuous lamella (mac2, Figs. 30 View FIGURES 26–31 , 32–35 View FIGURES 32–35 ); in T. rex   , the posterior branch is very long and curved, and in T. olympia   it is so small as to be difficult to see.

Description: Male paratype. Length, 8.0 mm, width, 0.75 mm. Nonsexual characters ( Figs. 42 View FIGURE 42 , 43 View FIGURES 43–47 ) and secondary sexual modifications ( Figs. 37 View FIGURES 36–38 –39, 40, 41, 44) as described for the genus. Gonopods ( Figs. 30–35 View FIGURES 26–31 View FIGURES 32–35 ) robust; gonopod sternum (gst, Fig. 32 View FIGURES 32–35 ) broad, well-sclerotized. Median angiocoxite with anteriormost branch (mac1, Figs. 30 View FIGURES 26–31 , 32, 34, 35 View FIGURES 32–35 ) short, bluntly two-lobed; posteriormost branch (mac2, Figs. 31,35) projecting strongly posteriad as complex, undulate lamella. Lateral angiocoxite three-branched, anteriormost branch (lac1, Figs. 30 View FIGURES 26–31 , 32–35 View FIGURES 32–35 ) broad, blunt, with complex tip; median branch (lac2, Figs. 31 View FIGURES 26–31 , 33–35 View FIGURES 32–35 ) relatively small, with comb-like array of spines; posteriormost branch (lac3, Figs. 33, 34 View FIGURES 32–35 ) broadly based, rapidly tapering distally to blunt spine. Colpocoxites (cc, Fig. 33 View FIGURES 32–35 ) relatively large (but collapsed in Fig. 31 View FIGURES 26–31 ), with small, triangular cuticular scales. Ninth legpair ( Fig. 31 View FIGURES 26–31 ) robust, showing less fusion of sternum (s9, Fig. 31 View FIGURES 26–31 coxa (c9) and telopodite (t9) than in other species, telopodite relatively robust, in situ partially concealing gonopods ( Fig. 41 View FIGURES 40, 41 ). Tenth legpair with enlarged, glandular coxae.

Female paratype. Length, 8.5 mm, width 0.82 mm. Nonsexual characters as in male. Vulvae as in Fig. 37 View FIGURES 36–38 .

Distribution: WASHINGTON: Whahiakum Co., Elochamin River, 9.6 mi N of SR4, 480’ asl, N46°17.378’, W123°15.891’, 21 March 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart, m, ff, juvs. Altuna-Pillar Rock Road, 2.7 mi S of SR4 (along Grays River) 50’ asl, N46°18.499’, W123°40.128’, 17 January 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart. ff. Rock Creek at Elochamin River, N46°16.578, W123°16.771’; 317’ asl 10 January 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart, m. 11.7 mi up Elochamin Valley Rd from SR4, 450’ asl, N46°19.007’, N123°15.702’, 28 March 2004, C. Richart, mm, 9.5 mi N of SR14, 500’ asl, N46°17.37’, W123°15.86’, 27 December 2004, W. Leonard, mm. Pacific Co: Sawlog Slough Campground, Long Island, 27 January 2003, C. Richart, m. Trap Creek, 1.1 mi N of SR12, 3 May 2003, W. Leonard, m. 1.1mi S of Rt. 6 on Trap Creek Road, N46°32.581’, W123°36.908’, 19 November 2005, W. Leonard, C. Richart, mm. Walberg Road, 1.0 mi N of Chinook Valley Road, 9 May 2003, W. Leonard, m. Ellsworth Creek Preserve, 50’ asl, N46°23.887’, W123°53.391’, 23 November 2003, W. Leonard et al, mm, ff. 4.5 mi N of Rt. 4 on US 101, at Middle Nemah River, N46°29.224’, W123°53.192’, 15 January 2006, W. Leonard, C. Richart, mm. South Fork of Willapa River drainage, 6 mi S of Raymond, 250’ asl, N46°34.51’, W123.°3.30’, 5 August 2006, C. Richart, m. 8 mi SE of Menlo, 150’ asl, 12 December 2005, A. Foster, f. Cowlitz Co.: Germany Creek, 5.5. mi N of SR4, N46°15.65’, W123°08.06’, 350’asl, 8 December 2003, W. Leonard, m. SR504, 9.8 mi E of Toutle, 750’asl, N46°21.893’, W122°35.300’, 1 March 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart, m. Pin Creek, 0.5 mi E of Carrolls, red cedar, bigleaf maple forest, 2 March 2003, W. Leonard, f. 12.7 mi E of Frontage Road on Rose Valley Road, N46.1692°, W122.7080°, 166 m asl, 29 April 2007, W. Leonard, C. Richart, f.

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Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile