Trisaria rex, Shear, 2020

Shear, William A., 2020, The millipede family Striariidae Bollman, 1893: I. Introduction to the family, synonymy of Vaferaria Causey with Amplaria Chamberlin, the new subfamily Trisariinae, the new genus Trisaria, and three new species (Diplopoda, Chordeumatida, Striarioidea), Zootaxa 4758 (2), pp. 275-295: 284

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4758.2.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:2539ABCC-161E-44B2-BB2C-C949B1A7C94D

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3812351

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0F4F0D64-253D-FFA7-FF69-FD73FB46B8FE

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Trisaria rex
status

new species

Trisaria rex   , new species

Figs. 15–28 View FIGURES 15–19 View FIGURES 20–25 View FIGURES 26–31

Types: Male holotype and 3 female paratypes from. I-90 exit #37, 1300’ asl, N47°26.613’, W121°40.061’, 21 January 2005, W. Leonard, King Co., Washington, 25 February 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart, deposited in Burke Memorial Museum, University of Washington   , Seattle, Washington.

Etymology: The species epithet (Latin, “king”) refers to King County, Washington, to which the species seems endemic.

Diagnosis: Distinct in the form of the gonopods and ninth legs. The posterior branch of the median angiocoxite is very long (mac2, Figs. 22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ), while it is short in both T. olympia   and T. washingtonensis   . In contrast to the robust form of the ninth leg telopodite in the other two species, that of T. rex   is strongly compressed (t9, Figs. 20, 23 View FIGURES 20–25 , 28 View FIGURES 26–31 ).

Description: Male from Twin Falls/Iron Horse trailhead. Length, 8.0 mm, width, 0.82 mm. Body form and secondary sexual modifications as described for genus. Gonopods ( Figs.20–22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26, 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) robust, sternum (gst, Figs. 20, 21 View FIGURES 20–25 ) broad, well-sclerotized. Median angiocoxite (mac, Fig. 20 View FIGURES 20–25 ) with two branches: the anteriormost (mac1, Figs. 21 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26 View FIGURES 26–31 ) short, blunt; the posterior most (mac2, Figs. 22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26, 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) long, bent posteriorly at nearly a right angle, then dorsally at a slightly more obtuse angle. Lateral angiocoxite (lac, Fig. 20 View FIGURES 20–25 ) with three branches: the anteriormost (lac1, Figs. 21 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26, 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) long, slightly curved, divided at tip into two processes, each of these further divided into three or four smaller, acute terminations, one set pointing anterior, the other posterior. Median branch (lac2, Figs. 21, 22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26, 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) set with dense array of fine spines, giving comb-like appearance. Posteriormost branch (lac3, Figs. 22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) short, simple, bluntly acuminate. Colpocoxites (cc, Figs. 22 View FIGURES 20–25 , 26, 27 View FIGURES 26–31 ) entirely membranous, with scaly cuticle. Ninth legs ( Figs. 23 View FIGURES 20–25 ) much reduced, sternum (st9, Figs. 23 View FIGURES 20–25 ), coxae (c9), telopodites (t9) almost completely fused, telopodites much flattened, distally setose; coxae with minute anterior pore (cp, Fig. 23 View FIGURES 20–25 ). Tenth legs ( Fig. 24 View FIGURES 20–25 ) with enlarged coxae (c10, Fig. 24 View FIGURES 20–25 ) bearing glands (gp, Fig. 24 View FIGURES 20–25 ).

Female from Twin Falls/Iron Horse trailhead. Length, 9.2 mm, width 0.90 mm. Nonsexual characters as in male.

Distribution: WASHINGTON: King Co.: North of I90, Pratt Lake Trailhead, N47°23.829, W121°29.109, 25 October 2003, W. Leonard, m, f. Same, but N47°23.821’, W121°29.108’, 1700’ asl, 15 October 2009, mm. I-90 at Snoqualmie River, Twin Falls/Iron Horse Trailhead, N47°26.651’, W121°40.081’, 25 February 2004, W. Leonard, C. Richart, m, f; Tokul Creek, 520’ asl, 47.556°N, 121.817°W, 21 November 1979, R. Crawford, m.

Notes: Presently this species is known only from central and western King County, Washington.