Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807

Williams, Paul H., Altanchimeg, Dorjsuren, Byvaltsev, Alexandr, Jonghe, Roland De, Jaffar, Saleem, Japoshvili, George, Kahono, Sih, Liang, Huan, Mei, Maurizio, Monfared, Alireza, Nidup, Tshering, Raina, Rifat, Ren, Zongxin, Thanoosing, Chawatat, Zhao, Yanhui & Orr, Michael C., 2020, Widespread polytypic species or complexes of local species? Revising bumblebees of the subgenus Melanobombus world-wide (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombus), European Journal of Taxonomy 719, pp. 1-120: 69-70

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5852/ejt.2020.719.1107

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A4500016-C219-4353-B81C-5E0BB520547F

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/252087CA-1F06-957C-FDDA-FD4BDF5AF863

treatment provided by

Valdenar

scientific name

Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807
status

 

Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807  

Figs 4 View Figs 1‒6 , 14 View Figs 14‒16 , 108–114 View Figs 103–138 , 193 View Figs 190‒198

Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807: 265   .

Bombus caucasicus Radoszkowski, 1860: 482   .

Bombus caucasicus   var. geogr   . [subsp.] tenuicinctus Vogt, 1911: 59.

Bombus caucasicus   var. geogr   . [subsp.] mixtocinctus Vogt, 1911: 59.

Bombus lapidarius   (part) – Reinig 1935: 334. — Williams 1998: 134 (non Linnaeus, 1758: 579).

Vogt (1909: 41, 49) considered the taxon eriophorus   s. str. (thoracic dorsum uniformly white) and the taxon caucasicus   (thoracic dorsum white with a black band between the wing bases) to be parts of B. lapidarius   s. lat. (thorax black or often with anterior and sometimes posterior yellow bands). Subsequently, Vogt (1911: 69) regarded B. caucasicus   as a species separate from B. lapidarius   and listed the taxon eriophorus   s. str. as part of B. caucasicus   (even though eriophorus   s. lat. is the oldest available name for the species). Reinig (1935: text-fig. 4) considered the taxon eriophorus   s. str. and the taxon caucasicus   to be parts of B. lapidarius   s. lat., showing colour-pattern diagrams with apparently intermediate colour patterns as part of his evidence.

Lecocq et al. (2015) considered that B. caucasicus   is likely to be a species separate from B. lapidarius   from evidence of COI-coalescent analysis and from differences in composition of cephalic labial gland secretions (CLGS, believed to include sex pheromones). They had no samples of B. eriophorus   s. str. but considered it likely to be conspecific with B. caucasicus   .

In contrast to Reinig (1935), we agree with Lecocq et al. (2015) that B. eriophorus   s. lat. and B. lapidarius   s. lat. are separate species from evidence of COI coalescents ( Fig. 10 View Fig ), corroborated by morphology.

Our PTP analysis ( Fig. 10 View Fig ) of coalescents in the COI gene supports three coalescents for candidate species within the lapidarius- group as identified in the four gene species tree ( Figs 21–22 View Fig View Fig ): a Caucasusregion candidate species, caucasicus   , supported strongly, and two more widespread candidate species within the European taxon lapidarius   s. lat., supported relatively weakly. We have been unable to secure fresh samples of the taxon eriophorus   s. str. – recent collections in the Caucasus mountains made by three different collectors of bumblebees have been unable to find this taxon.

From morphology, B. eriophorus   s. lat. has a colour pattern distinct from B. lapidarius   s. lat. for the females with a white-banded thorax. A worker from Azerbaijan in the NHMUK has the black hair of the band between the wing bases much intermixed with white hair, representing a state intermediate between that typical for the taxon eriophorus   s. str. and that for the taxon caucasicus   . This is slightly darker than the infrasubspecific taxon atava illustrated in Reinig (1935: text-fig. 4-iv). However, both the NHMUK worker and Reinig’s taxon atava with their mixtures of black and white hairs between the wing bases appear to be intermediate in colour pattern between the white unbanded taxon eriophorus   s. str. and the white-banded taxon caucasicus   , so these two taxa are interpreted provisionally as conspecific as parts of B. eriophorus   s. lat.

Diagnosis

Females ( Fig. 4 View Figs 1‒6 )

Queens medium-sized body length 17–21 mm, workers 11–15 mm. Can be distinguished in West Asia by their combination of the thoracic dorsum with some pure white hair and the hair of the face and T1–2 black (cf. B. lapidarius   , B. sichelii   , B. incertus   , B. alagesianus   ). Workers can be distinguished (cf. B. simillimus   ) by the combination of the pale hair of the thoracic dorsum white with T1–2 black and the wings clear.

Males

Body length 12–14 mm. Can be distinguished in West Asia by their combination of thoracic dorsum with extensive yellow hair and T2 usually predominantly black. Genitalia ( Fig. 193 View Figs 190‒198 ) with the gonostylus as long as broad, reduced as a rounded flat scale with the inner basal process reduced to a tooth (cf. rufipesgroup, festivus- group, rufofasciatus   -group); volsella with the inner distal corner broadly produced but without a narrow hook (cf. rufipes- group, festivus- group, rufofasciatus   -group); penis valve head with the recurved inner hook just broader than the narrowest part of the adjacent penis valve shaft (cf. B. lapidarius   ); eye unenlarged relative to female eye.

Material examined

Holotype

? RUSSIA • ♀; “monte Caucaso”; “ D. Marshall de Biberstein ” leg.; type of Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807   not found ( ZIN, ZMHB, ZMUM; possibly lost in a fire with other ZMUM material following the Napoleonic invasion in 1812, A. Antropov pers. com.), but identity not in doubt.  

Material sequenced (3 specimens)

GEORGIA • 1 ♀ (queen); Calka ; 41.5891° N, 44.1330° E; 27 May 2011; G. Japoshvili leg.; BOLD seq: 1555A04; AUG: ML175 GoogleMaps   .

TURKEY • 1 ♀ (worker); Artvin; 41.0641° N, 42.2749° E; H. Hines leg.; BOLD seq: 6877H04; SC: ML420 GoogleMaps   .

ARMENIA • 1 ♀ (queen); Gegharkunik, Sevan Lake south of Shorzha ; 40.4959° N, 45.2788° E; 7 Jul. 2006; Louda leg.; BOLD seq: 6880A03; MM: ML478 GoogleMaps   .

Global distribution

(West Asian mountain species) West Asia: TURKEY, GEORGIA, ARMENIA, AZERBAIJAN, RUSSIA: Krasnodar, Stavropol. ( AUG, MM, NHMUK, SC.) The species is not known to be common anywhere.

Behaviour

Food-plant choice expected to be generalist but no records. The male mate-searching behaviour is expected to resemble the patrolling of B. lapidarius   .

ZIN

Russian Academy of Sciences, Zoological Institute, Zoological Museum

ZMUM

Zoological Museum, University of Amoy

MM

University of Montpellier

NHMUK

Natural History Museum, London

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hymenoptera

Family

Apidae

Genus

Bombus

Loc

Bombus eriophorus Klug, 1807

Williams, Paul H., Altanchimeg, Dorjsuren, Byvaltsev, Alexandr, Jonghe, Roland De, Jaffar, Saleem, Japoshvili, George, Kahono, Sih, Liang, Huan, Mei, Maurizio, Monfared, Alireza, Nidup, Tshering, Raina, Rifat, Ren, Zongxin, Thanoosing, Chawatat, Zhao, Yanhui & Orr, Michael C. 2020
2020
Loc

Bombus lapidarius

Williams P. H. 1998: 134
Reinig W. F. 1935: 334
Linnaeus C. 1758: 579
1935
Loc

Bombus caucasicus

Vogt O. 1911: 59
1911
Loc

Bombus caucasicus

Vogt O. 1911: 59
1911
Loc

Bombus caucasicus

Radoszkowski O. 1860: 482
1860
Loc

Bombus eriophorus

Klug F. 1807: 265
1807