Bruchinae,

Reid, C. A. M. & Beatson, M., 2013, A new genus and species of Bruchinae, with a key to the genera from Australia (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), Zootaxa 3599 (6), pp. 535-548: 544-546

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3599.6.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:AED470D7-F2C7-48D5-B9D7-8B849A6EB4AE

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/45114E10-FFC3-FF80-FF15-0856ECC93BC7

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Bruchinae
status

 

Key to genera of Bruchinae  in Australia

The Australian literature is seriously out of date, because there have been no keys to genera or species of Bruchinae  in Australia for more than 100 years (Lea 1899), except to the small South Australian fauna ( Matthews & Reid 2002). During that time generic concepts have radically changed ( Borowiec 1987) and several exotic genera have been introduced for biocontrol of weeds ( Julien, McFadyen & Cullen 2012). This key is based on all known established genera, exotic or native, which are as follows: Acanthoscelides Schilsky, 1905  , with four introduced species (Raghu, Wiltshire & Dhileepan 2005; Heard 2012); Algarobius Bridwell, 1946  , with two introduced species (van Klinken 2012); Bruchidius Schilsky, 1905  , a large and polyphyletic taxon ( Southgate 1979; Kergoat et al. 2011), with nine native species including five hereby transferred from Bruchus  based on examination of types in SAM ( Bruchidius diversipes (Lea, 1899)  comb. nov., B. maestus (Lea, 1899)  comb. nov., B. oodnadattae ( Blackburn, 1900)  comb. nov., B. persimulans ( Blackburn, 1900)  comb. nov., B. quornensis ( Blackburn, 1900)  comb. nov.), and three exotic species ( Southgate 1979; Palmer, Lockett & Dileepan 2012); Bruchus Linneus, 1767  , with one exotic species ( Matthews & Reid 2002); Callosobruchus Pic, 1902  , with two exotic and one indigenous species ( Anton 2000; Lambrides & Imrie 2000); Caryedon Schoenherr, 1823  , with one introduced species (Delobel et al. 2003); Mimosestes Bridwell, 1946  , with one introduced species, which may have died out (van Klinken & Heard 2012); Parasulcobruchus Anton, 1999 c  , a recently erected genus poorly differentiated from Bruchidius  as understood here, with one endemic species ( Anton 1999 c); Penthobruchus Kingsolver, 1973  , with one introduced species (van Klinken & Heard 2012); Spermophagus Schoenherr, 1833  , with two species, one introduced ( Borowiec 1991; Anton 1999 b). To these we add Caryotrypes Decelle, 1968  , based on a single specimen collected on Lizard Island, Queensland, in 1993. Caryotrypes  is a south Asian genus of two species, one of which has been bred from Pandanus seeds ( Blanchard 1845; Decelle 1968; Anton 1999 a), suggesting a link to the palm-feeding pachymerines of South America.

Quarantine interceptions of other genera are excluded from this key, as they are numerous and do not represent established species. These genera include (pers. obs., CAMR): Amblycerus Thunberg, 1815  , Caryedes Hummel, 1827  , Caryobruchus Bridwell, 1929  , Megabruchidius Borowiec, 1984  , Pachymerus Thunberg, 1805  , Specularius Bridwell, 1938  , Stator Bridwell, 1946  , Zabrotes Horn, 1885  . A failed introduction, of Meibomeus Bridwell, 1946 (Julien 2002)  , is also excluded from this key.

The key is has been constructed from examination of all known species present in Australia. * = introduced (exotic) genus.

1. Ventral surface of hind femur with a well-developed preapical comb (pecten), with> 5 teeth.......................... 2

– Hind femur with 0–3 ventral teeth........................................................................ 5

2 (1). Prosternal process short and triangular, not visible between coxae; pro and mesotibiae with 0–1 apical spur; frons with strong median keel; length ventrite 1> 2–5 together............................................................... 3

– Prosternal process parallel-sided, visible between coxae; pro and mesotibiae with 2 apical spurs; frons without median keel; length ventrite 1 = 2–4 together (lateral margins pronotum complete; Victorian Alps)................. Buburra  gen. nov.

3 (2). Eyes massive, separated by 0.2–0.3 x eye width in dorsal view, with large facets; antennomeres 5–10 serrate, elongate; dorsal pubescence uniform, sculpture not rugose; abdomen uniformly setose; pro and mid tibiae with 1 apical spur............. 4

– Eyes smaller, separated by c. 0.5 x eye width, with small facets; antennomeres 5–10 not serrate, transverse; sides pronotum concave; dorsal pubescence variegated, surfaces rugose; abdomen with smooth shining unsculptured areas (specula); pro and mid tibiae without apical spur (tropics)............................................... * Penthobruchus Kingsolver. 

4 (3). Pronotum widest at middle, with obtuse hind angles; pronotal lateral margination complete, but anterior third obscured by setae and puncturation; eyes smaller, separated by c. 0.3 eye width (North Queensland).............. Caryotrypes Decelle. 

– Pronotum widest at base, with 90 ° hind angles, contracted to anterior margin; pronotal lateral margination absent from anterior third; eyes larger, separated by c. 0.2 x eye width (tropics).................................... * Caryedon Schoenherr. 

5 (1). Hind tibia without apical spurs; apex scutellum bilobed or truncate; lateral margins of pronotum absent in apical half at least..... 6

– Hind tibia with 2 conspicuous apical spurs; scutellum triangular; lateral margins pronotum complete; hind femora without ventral teeth (flat, ovate species, mostly black; Queensland)................................. Spermophagus Schoenherr. 

6 (5). Lateral pronotal margin smoothly concave to convex; venter of hind femora without teeth or with tooth on internal margin or both margins......................................................................................... 7

– Lateral pronotal margin with blunt tubercle (may be obscured by setae); venter of hind femur with large preapical tooth on outer margin (antennomeres 7–10 not serrate; field crop pest).................................... * Bruchus Linnaeus. 

7 (6). Venter of hind femur without tooth on outer margin; posterior margin of pronotum truncate or feebly concave............ 8

– Venter of hind femora with single tooth on both internal and external margins; posterior margin of pronotum bilobed at junction with scutellum (males with serrate or flabellate antennae; tropics and stored products pest)......... Callosobruchus Pic. 

8 (7). Venter of hind femur with 3 distinct preapical teeth, proximal tooth much larger than others........................... 9

– Venter of hind femur without teeth or with 1–2 preapical teeth................................................. 10

9 (8). Hind tibia with longer apical spine, approximately as long as apical width of tibia; scutellum elongate, less deeply bilobed; base of elytron with small elevated shining denticles; female pygidium with two elongate glabrous patches (tropics)........................................................................................... * Algarobius Bridwell. 

– Hind tibia with shorter apical spine, approximately half apical width tibia; scutellum quadrate, more deeply bilobed; base of

elytron without elevated shining denticles; female pygidium uniformly setose (stored products pest).................................................................................................... * Acanthoscelides Schilsky.  10 (8). Without distinctive high contrast colour pattern, mostly uniformly greyish or brown or slightly variegated (venter of hund femur with or without tooth; male antennae sometimes serrate)................................................ 11

– With distinctive colour pattern: head, pronotum, inner part of elytra, venter and legs clothed in dense white setae, outer part of elytra with contrasting black setae (venter of hind femur with small blunt preapical tooth; antennae not serrate; tropics)........................................................................................ * Mimosestes Bridwell. 

11 (10). Apicodorsal hind tibial spines longer than apicolateral and apicoventral spines (hind femur with large preapical ventral tooth; antennae not serrate; NSW)......................................................... Parasulcobruchus Anton. 

– Apicodorsal hind tibial spines shorter than apicolateral and apicoventral spines (hind femur with or without preapical ventral tooth; antennae variable; throughout Australia).............................................. Bruchidius Schilsky. 

SAM

South African Museum

NSW

Royal Botanic Gardens, National Herbarium of New South Wales