Trogidae, MacLeay, 1819

Slay, Michael E., Skelley, Paul E. & Taylor, Steven J., 2012, New Records ofOnthophagus cavernicollisHowden and Cartwright (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Ozark Caves, with a Review of Scarabaeoids Reported from North American Caves, The Coleopterists Bulletin 66 (3), pp. 187-199: 196-197

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.1649/072.066.0302

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/544887BA-FF82-4429-6721-FDD8FDF2094B

treatment provided by

Diego

scientific name

Trogidae
status

 

Trogidae  

Omorgus carinatus (Loomis)   . Cokendolpher and Polyak (1996) reported a specimen from New Mexico: Eddy Co.: Sinkhole Flat, Milliped Cave (BLM-NM-060-123), “… taken at the twilight/ dark junction on the wall of Milliped Cave.” Omorgus carinatus   occurs in the southwestern US and is rarely collected. It appears to be associated with crevices and woodrat nests ( Vaurie 1955; C. Olson and W. B.Warner, 1990s, personal communication). The apparent association with woodrat nests could lead to additional cave collections because woodrats commonly utilize caves when they are available. Because this beetle has only been reported once from caves, we consider it an accidental collection   .

Omorgus suberosus   (F.). Kohls and Jellison (1948) reported specimens of “ Trox suberosus   ” from two bat caves in Texas. The species was found on bat guano in Bracken Cave, Comal County and in Ney Cave, Medina County. The beetles were collected during late summer (Kohls and Jellison 1948). Omorgus suberosus   is one of the most abundant, widespread generalist members of the family, occurring throughout most of the Western Hemisphere ( Vaurie 1955; Harpootlian 2001; Ratcliffe and Paulsen 2008). These are considered accidental collections.

Trox aequalis Say. Reeves et al. (2000)   reported T. aequalis   living in bat guano in Georgia: Walker Co.: Fricks Cave. Trox aequalis   is a widespread species occurring in the central and eastern US. It is frequently found in various bird and mammal nests ( Vaurie 1955; Ratcliffe and Paulsen 2008). The association with nests of various facultatively cavernicolous animals could lead to additional cave collections. Because the species has only been reported once from caves, we consider it an accidental collection.

Trox laticollis LeConte. Peck and Christiansen (1990)   gave a single record of T. laticollis   from a cave in Iowa. Trox laticollis   is a widespread eastern US species that is rarely collected. Most biological data indicates they prefer fox dens ( Vaurie 1955; Ratcliffe and Paulsen 2008). This apparent association with fox dens could lead to additional cave collections. Because the species has only been reported once from caves, we consider it an accidental collection.

Trox scaber   (L.). Gardner (1986) reported a specimen from Missouri: Miller Co.: Buzzards Perch Cave. “This adult specimen was collected from beneath excrement in a turkey vulture nest.” Trox scaber   is widespread in the northern half of the US and southern Canada, where it is infrequently collected. It is most often found in nests of various animals as well as old animal carcasses ( Vaurie 1955; Ratcliffe and Paulsen 2008). The association with nests of various animals could lead to additional cave collections. Because the species has only been reported once from caves, we consider it an accidental collection.

Trox sp.   Crawford and Veni (1981) report finding one dead specimen buried in guano in Sorcerer’ s Cave, Terrell County, Texas. Without a study of their specimen to complete the identification, no additional comments can be made   .

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Coleoptera

Family

Trogidae

Loc

Trogidae

Slay, Michael E., Skelley, Paul E. & Taylor, Steven J. 2012
2012
Loc

Trox aequalis

Say. Reeves 2000
2000
Loc

Trox suberosus

Fabricius 1775
1775