Trimma tevegae Cohen & Davis, 1969, Cohen & Davis, 1969

Winterbottom, Richard & Hoese, Douglass F., 2015, A revision of the Australian species of Trimma (Actinopterygii, Gobiidae), with descriptions of six new species and redescriptions of twenty-three valid species, Zootaxa 3934 (1), pp. 1-102: 87-90

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3934.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:11C2A2CB-30B3-4694-B379-AE9D47332F0C

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3508663

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/5519879A-B855-F31C-FF1F-FA726E07E86C

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Trimma tevegae Cohen & Davis, 1969
status

 

Trimma tevegae Cohen & Davis, 1969  

Bluestripe Pygmygoby

Figs. 49–50 View FIGURE 49 View FIGURE 50 , Pl. 4 A

Trimma tevegae Cohen & Davis, 1969: 321   (Rabaul, New Britain); Kuiter, 1992: 236 D; Shao et al., 1992: 330, B; Kobayashi, 1994: 120 (# 4); Randall et al., 1997: 536; Myers, 1999:pl. 163 (LMM); Kuiter, 1998: 209;? Hayashi & Shiratori, 2003: 39 (x 2); Kimura & Matsuura, 2003: 193; Allen et al., 2004: 330; Kuiter & Tonozuka, 2004: 707; Anderson, 2005: 105; Randall, 2005: 554.

Trimma   sp. 9:? Senou et al., 2004: 113 (x 2); Allen & Erdmann, 2012: 948 (Red Sea to western Pacific)

Material. Australian Material. Queensland: Ashmore Reef: AMS I. 33720 -056, 2 (10–11), 2–32 m; AMS I. 33730 -036, 8, 21– 32 m. Escape Reef: AMS I. 22576 -026, 3 (23–27), 34 m; AMS I. 22580 -016, 2 (21–22), 37 m; AMS I. 22580 -019, 2 (17–18), 37 m; AMS I. 22587 -014, 2 (23–24), 40 m; AMS I. 22613 -030, 25, 27 m; AMS I. 22627 -013, 4 (21–23), 52–60 m; AMS I. 22629 -007, 3 (22–24), 56–60 m; ROM 40468 View Materials , 2(24–26), 40 m. Lihou Reef: WAM P.29638.016, 4(14–25), 20– 35 m. Lizard Id: AMS I. 20730 -006, 3 (14–24), 20– 22 m. One Tree Id: AMS I. 20206 -014, (23), 22– 30 m. Raine Id: AMS I. 20775 -059, 3 (9–21), 20 m. Tijou Reef: AMS I. 20779 -145, 2(13–15), 25 m. Yonge Reef: AMS I. 19454 -061, (26), 1– 18 m. W estern Australia: Rowley Shoals: WAM P. 28024.021, (28), 35–40 m; WAM P. 28024.033, (18), 35– 40 m.

Other material. Note: For AMS and ROM material, we provide catalogue numbers, number of specimens, length range and depth of capture where known. For other institutions, we list only catalogue number and number of specimens. American Samoa: AMS I. 21988 -002, 5 (18–25), 58– 64 m. Carolines: BPBM 12169, 1; BPBM 22370, 1. Fiji: AMS I. 18352 -030, (21); ROM 46029 View Materials , (13), 9–11 m; ROM 46030 View Materials , 3(17–21), 10–15 m; ROM 46031 View Materials , (16), 8–12 m; ROM 46032 View Materials , (20), 5– 10 m. Indonesia: BPBM 26646, 2; BPBM 31517, 2; ex-CAS 64166, 1; ROM 64645 View Materials , 2(12–15), 16 m; ROM 70715 View Materials , 7(14–24), 30 m; ROM 70707 View Materials , (22), 15 m; ROM 85131 View Materials , 20(8–20), 20– 23 m. Japan: BPBM 8741, 11; LICPP 1970179, 4; LICPP 1971264, 1. Malaysia: ROM 56633 View Materials , 2(20–25), 8 m. New Caledonia: ROM 63930 View Materials , (24), 18–27 m; ROM 63931 View Materials , (22), 18– 26 m. Palau: AMS I. 17939 –001, (22), 38 m; AMS I. 17935 –003, (16), 46 m; BPBM 31457, 3; CAS 60050 View Materials , 27; ROM 70727 View Materials , (22), 91 m; ROM 70730 View Materials , 4(17 – 2), 91 m; ROM 70729 View Materials , 16(14–29), 91 m; ROM 74794 View Materials , 79(8–24), 14–26 m; ROM 74795 View Materials , 74(8–24), 15–27 m; ROM 74796 View Materials , 6(14–23), 31–43 m; ROM 74888 View Materials , 58(8–23), 12–21 m; ROM 76100 View Materials , 13(7–19), 15–31 m; ROM 76414 View Materials , 11(8–20), 18–31 m; ROM 80312 View Materials , 2(20–23), 12–26 m; ROM 80321 View Materials , (17), 0–7 m; ROM 80325 View Materials , 2(12–16), 37–46 m; ROM 80024 View Materials , 2(21–28), 12 m; ROM 80305 View Materials , 2(16–18), 27–42 m; ROM 80357 View Materials , 2(12–20), 73 m; ROM 80363 View Materials , 3(17–21), 17 m; ROM 80390 View Materials , 62(8–22), 20–27 m; ROM 80400 View Materials , 5(14–20), 20–27 m; ROM 80417 View Materials , 9(9–19), 24–37 m; ROM 81939 View Materials , 3 (7–16), 15 m; ROM 82404 View Materials , 8(10–21), 50 m. Papua New Guinea: Bismarck Archipelago, Rabaul: ROM 88119 View Materials , 4(16–19), 19.5 m; ROM 88123 View Materials , 7(15–21), 27 m; ROM 88124 View Materials , 5(17– 19), 19.5 m; ROM 88140 View Materials , 3(18 – 10), 19.5 m; ROM 88143 View Materials , 4(16–19), 17.7 m; ROM 88153 View Materials , 2(20), 15 m; ROM 91272 View Materials , 3(15–17), 30.5 m; ROM 92091 View Materials , 2(16–17), 13.4 m; ROM 92109 View Materials , (21), 20.7 m; ROM 92112 View Materials , 2(18–20), 18.3 m; ROM 92117 View Materials , (15), 27.7 m; ROM 92121 View Materials , (15), 20 m; ROM 92124 View Materials , (16), 31.4 m; ROM 92129 View Materials , 3(21 –22.0), 25.6 m; ROM 92137 View Materials , (8), 15 m; ROM 92139 View Materials , 5(16–19), 22 m; ROM 92152 View Materials , 3(16–18), 18.2 m; ROM 92169 View Materials , (18), 11.9 m; ROM 92182 View Materials , 10(13–25), 26.8 m; ROM 92246 View Materials , 3(16–19), 19.5 m; ROM 92253 View Materials , (14), 18.9 m; ROM 92259 View Materials , 3(16–18), 23.7 m; ROM 92271 View Materials , 3(19–20), 17.1 m; ROM 92277 View Materials , 3(13–20), 21.3 m; ROM 92285 View Materials , (19), 17.8 m; ROM 92290 View Materials , 4(18–19), 15.2 m; ROM 92304 View Materials , (17), 16.5 m; ROM 92313 View Materials , (19), 19.8 m; ROM 92321 View Materials , (21), 17.4 m; USNM 203436, (20), holotype; USNM 203437, 10(13–20), paratypes (from original description). Other PNG material: AMS I. 24375 -001, 11 (13–20), 15 m; BPBM 32448, 3; BPBM 36880, 1; WAM P.28161.008, 9; WAM P.28170.001, 4; WAM P.28172.016, 9; WAM P.28178.013, 1; WAM P.28186.014, 1. Philippines: AMS I. 21903 -018, 4 (9–20), 3–15 m; AMS I. 21927 -007, 17 (8–23), 14–21 m; BPBM 28521, 5; LICPP 1984237, 4; LICPP 1983349, 2; LICPP 1977087, 1; ROM 49222 View Materials , 11(12–22), 12–18 m; ROM 49223 View Materials , 2(9–18), 12–20 m; ROM 53087 View Materials , (25), 12–21 m; ROM 53088 View Materials , 2(23–25), 12–18 m; ROM 53089 View Materials , (24), 14–18 m; ROM 53090 View Materials , 2(16–20), 5–12 m; ROM 53091 View Materials , 8(15–23), 15–21 m; ROM 53092 View Materials , 6(12–27), 24–37 m; ROM 53093 View Materials , 6(9–17), 18–35 m; ROM 53094 View Materials , 10(20–26), 15–26 m; ROM 53122 View Materials , (23), 3–11 m; ROM 53095 View Materials , 11(14–265), 9–23 m; ROM 53096 View Materials , 7(10–24), 9– 21 m. Solomons: AMS I. 39040 -072, (23), 10–30 m; AMS I. 39033 -082, 5, 3– 17 m; AMS I. 39005 -065, (19), 35 m; ROM E, 4 (10–27), 8 m; ROM 0839CS, 8 (10–31), 20–22 m; ROM 46126 View Materials , (18), 21 m; ROM 46130 View Materials , 21(7–22), 18–22 m; ROM 46132 View Materials , 12(11–22), 18– 22 m. Taiwan: BPBM 23375, 1. Tonga: USNM 341463, 2.

Diagnosis. A species of Trimma   with a bony interorbital greater or equal to pupil diameter, a fully scaled nape, papillae in longitudinal row immediately below eye single or with two papillae in a vertical row but not in vertical rows of 3–5 papillae each, usually unbranched pectoral-fin rays, an unbranched fifth pelvic-fin ray that is about 50 % the length of the fourth ray, and a large dark blotch on the posterior caudal peduncle. Fresh, mature specimens> 20 mm SL may have a blue or purple stripe along the midline of the body reaching to the dorsal margin of the pupil, and another in the dorsal midline from the tip of the snout to the origin of the first dorsal fin.

Description. The description is based on five lots, 14 specimens (13.5–25.5 mm SL) from the northern Great Barrier Reef. Dorsal fin VI + I 8, second spine slightly to moderately elongated, reaching to between base of dorsal spine of second dorsal fin and that of third ray), all fin rays branched except for posterior element of last; anal fin I 8, first ray usually unbranched (12 of 14); pectoral fin 13–15 (mean = 14.4, n = 14), rays usually unbranched, but 1–4 of middle rays branched in four specimens, all> 20 mm SL; pelvic fin I 5, fifth ray unbranched (left side branched once dichotomously in largest specimen) and about 42–62 % (mean = 54.1, n = 7) length of fourth ray, which reaches posteriorly to between bases of anal spine and third ray, basal membrane 6–11 % (mean = 9.0, n = 9) length of fifth ray. Lateral scales 23–24 (mean = 23.3); transverse scales 7–8 (mean = 7.8, n = 12); predorsal scales 11–12 (mean = 11.5, n = 13); breast and midline of belly with cycloid scales; 5–10 scales present on pectoral-fin base; cheek scaled, usually with three rows of cycloid scales below and behind eye, 6–8 scales in middle row, upper row of 0–1 and lower row of 2–4 scales; opercle with at least three horizontal rows of cycloid scales. Single row of small, closely spaced, pointed teeth around lower jaw with additional outer row of larger, widely spaced, curved teeth; two rows of small, closely spaced pointed teeth in upper jaw. Tongue rounded. Gill opening extends anteroventrally to below mid-pupil; gill rakers 3–5 + 15–17 = 19–21 (mean = 3.8 + 15.9 = 19.8, n = 13). Anterior nares in short tube, posterior opening pore-like with raised rim, nasal sac raised and positioned close to upper lip. Bony interorbital 70–100 % (mean = 83.6) pupil diameter; shallowly concave with median fleshy ridge forming broadly rounded W in cross section; epaxialis extending anteriorly to point above posterior half of pupil. Abdominal/caudal vertebral transition not examined (but probably Type A with haemal arches of first three caudal vertebrae expanded, as in other specimens currently identified as this species).

Colour pattern. Freshly collected. Body yellow, heavily invested with dark subdermal chromatophores, especially below midlateral septum ( Fig. 49 View FIGURE 49 ). Pale blue stripe, lying just above midlateral septum and tapering at both ends, from just behind eye at level of dorsal margin of pupil and fading out at about mid-length of caudal peduncle. A white, slightly oblique, bar about two scales wide posteriorly, thinning ventrally, broadening to about four scales wide just above midline, then narrowing to two scale widths dorsally. Large (slightly greater than eye diameter) dark red spot, much darker towards centre, covers hypural region of peduncle and proximal bases of caudal-fin rays. Blotch extends further anteriorly on lower half of body, giving anterior margin notched appearance. Iris yellow with dark mottling, with red margined blue stripe across it at level of upper pupil. Tips of jaws, upper cheek and opercle yellow, faint blue stripe below this on cheek bordered dorsally with red. Ventral margin of cheek below suffused with yellow. Scattered dark chromatophores form diffuse bar on base of pectoral fin, and tips of pelvic-fin rays tinged with mauve. Dorsal fins with dark purple basal band sprinkled with melanophores and iridocytes, followed by pupil-diameter wide yellowish stripe (broader posteriorly in both fins), distal part of fins mauve with liberal sprinkling of iridocytes. Caudal and anal fins mauve to bluish-purple, with pupil-diameter wide basal stripe of purple/red in anal fin. No underwater photographs of live specimens from Australia available. Pair of individuals with almost identical colour pattern from Biak, Indonesia shown in Pl. 4 A.

Preserved. Background colour light brown with scale pockets heavily outlined on dorsal portion of body, particularly beneath dorsal fin base. Scale pockets immediately above mid lateral septum very faintly outlined, and scale pockets below mid lateral septum more strongly outlined, forming light band down side of body midlaterally. Snout very heavily pigmented. Some scattered pigment present along ventral edge of eye, cheek below immaculate or almost so. Tip of lower jaw with scattered melanophores, most of ventral surface of body immaculate. Blotch on caudal peduncle dark brown, and covers posterior section of caudal peduncle and base of caudal fin.

Etymology. Named after the American research vessel “Te Vega”, a converted luxury yacht, operated at the time the type specimens were collected by Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station.

Distribution. The distribution is difficult to determine because of questions as to the potential confusion revolving around the taxonomy of this species (see Discussion). The blue striped form appears to range from the middle reaches of the Red Sea through the Maldives (but not south of this in the Indian Ocean) to the western Pacific as far east as the Marshall Islands and Samoa ( Fig. 50 View FIGURE 50 ).

Comparisons. Among the described species of Trimma   possessing a broad bony interorbital Trimma tevegae   , T. griffithsi   and T. nasa   all have a dark spot on the hypural region of the caudal peduncle. Trimma griffithsi   and T. nasa   can be distinguished from T. tevegae   in having a branched fifth pelvic ray, no scales on the cheek, and cycloid scales on the nape (vs. fifth ray unbranched, cheeks scaled, and ctenoid scales on the nape). The caudal spot on Trimma griffithsi   is much smaller and positioned on the lower half of the peduncle. Trimma nasa   has a very light colouration with much less pigment on the body compared with T. tevegae   , except for a dark ‘shadow’ created along the side by pigment on the peritoneum. Trimma tevegae   is more heavily pigmented along the dorsal surface than T. nasa   .

Discussion. Trimma tevegae   has previously been defined by a broad bony interorbital, scaled nape, unbranched fifth pelvic ray and the large dark patch on the posterior caudal peduncle. Variation in cheek scalation, snout stripe and lateral stripe were commonly seen within specimens from a single collection and across its extensive geographic range ( Winterbottom, 2005 b). Results of recent genetic studies, however, have caused its specific status to become a morphological Pandora's Box. The situation is extremely complex, and the reader is referred to Winterbottom et al. (2014) for details. Suffice it to say that we suspect the Australian material will be found to share the same haplogroup as Group 4 of Winterbottom et al. (2014), which is currently known from samples from Raja Ampat, Indonesia and Rabaul, New Britain.

This species, to which we provisionally apply the name Trimma tevegae   , has been collected at depths of 12– 73 m. The type material was collected in depths of 12–15 m, and Cohen and Davis (1969: 317) state that small groups of this goby were observed at the type locality (Dawapia Rocks, Rabaul, New Britain) in depths of 9– 30 m.

ROM

Royal Ontario Museum

WAM

Western Australian Museum

BPBM

Bishop Museum

LICPP

The Crown Prince's Palace

CAS

California Academy of Sciences

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Actinopterygii

Order

Perciformes

Family

Gobiidae

Genus

Trimma

Loc

Trimma tevegae Cohen & Davis, 1969

Winterbottom, Richard & Hoese, Douglass F. 2015
2015
Loc

Trimma

Allen 2012: 948
Senou 2004: 113
2004
Loc

Trimma tevegae

Anderson 2005: 105
Randall 2005: 554
Allen 2004: 330
Kuiter 2004: 707
Hayashi 2003: 39
Kimura 2003: 193
Kuiter 1998: 209
Randall 1997: 536
Kobayashi 1994: 120
Kuiter 1992: 236
Shao 1992: 330
Cohen 1969: 321
1969