Marshallicona quitu Cerretti & Pape

Cerretti, Pierfilippo, Badano, Davide, Gisondi, Silvia, Giudice, Giuseppe Lo & Pape, Thomas, 2020, The world woodlouse flies (Diptera, Rhinophoridae), ZooKeys 903, pp. 1-130: 1

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.903.37775

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:60467E58-F35B-4D2D-BC61-82568F56AD89

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/9757A5E7-81F5-517A-80B9-B2D3AB5A833B

treatment provided by

ZooKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Marshallicona quitu Cerretti & Pape
status

sp. nov.

Marshallicona quitu Cerretti & Pape   sp. nov. Figs 1C View Figure 1 , 15 View Figure 15

Type material.

Holotype ♂: Mindo-Bellavista Ecuador /Bellavista Cloud Forest Reserve / 0°3'28.57"S, 78°46'6.02"W /2000m 1 May 2001 /S.A. Marshall and S.P.L. Luk (PUCE). Paratypes 2 ♂♂: same data as holotype ( NHMD, MZUR).

Description.

Male. Body length: 4.5-5.5 mm. Colouration: head mostly black in ground colour, antenna and palpus brown; occiput and posterior 2/3 of fronto-orbital plate shiny without microtomentum, anterior 1/3 of fronto-orbital plate and parafacial covered with silver reflecting microtomentum; thorax (including tegula, basicosta, wing veins and legs) black in ground colour, microtomentum virtually absent; abdomen mainly yellow except brownish posterior margin of tergites 1+2, 3 and 4 and on posterior 1/2-2/3 of tergite 5. Wing membrane infuscate around veins. Head: frontal vitta slightly narrower than fronto-orbital plate (measured at midlength). Parafacial entirely bare below lower frontal seta. Lateral vertical seta not differentiated from strongest uppermost postocular setae. Prementum stout, not longer than wide; labella broad. Thorax: one posthumeral seta (medial); 1 + 1 supra-alar setae; 0 + 2 intra-alar setae; 2(3) + 3 dorsocentral setae; 0-3 + 1 acrostichal setae. One or 2 katepisternal setae. Legs: fore tibia without posterior seta. Abdomen: mid-dorsal depression on syntergite 1+2 confined to anterior half.

Distribution.

Neotropical - Ecuador.

Etymology.

The species epithet is derived from the Quitu tribe, the pre-Columbian indigenous people who founded the city of Quito, which is now the capital of Ecuador. The name should be treated as a noun in apposition.