Rhipicephalus evertsi,

Guglielmone, Alberto A., Petney, Trevor N. & Robbins, Richard G., 2020, Ixodidae (Acari: Ixodoidea): descriptions and redescriptions of all known species from 1758 to December 31, 2019, Zootaxa 4871 (1), pp. 1-322: 221-222

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4871.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:C21A719F-9A6B-4227-8386-1AFA22620614

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4582256

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/C04787D4-FF35-FF1F-FF0E-F99165AACAB3

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Rhipicephalus evertsi
status

 

25. Rhipicephalus evertsi  Neumann, 1897.

Chiefly an Afrotropical species but also found in the Palearctic Region. Guglielmone et al. (2014) listed Rhipicephalus eversti  as an Afrotropical tick but Alanazi et al. (2019) confirmed its presence in the Palearctic. All parasitic stages are usually found on Artiodactyla  : Bovidae  , but they have also been collected from Mammalia  (several orders), and occasionally from Passeriformes  : Alaudidae  and Hirundinidae  . Adult ticks alone have rarely been recovered from Accipitriformes  : Accipitridae  , and Testudines  : Testudinidae  ; larvae and nymphs have been taken from Aves  (several orders). Rhipicephalus evertsi  is a sporadic parasite of humans.

M: Neumann  (1897)

F: Neumann  (1897)

N: Howard (1908)

L: Bedford (1934); see note below

Redescriptions

M: Zumpt (1942c), Theiler (1943b), Hoogstraal (1956a), Elbl and Anastos (1966c), Matthysse and Colbo (1987), Walker et al. (2000), Walker, A.R. et al. (2003), Horak et al. (2018)

F: Zumpt (1942c), Theiler (1943b), Hoogstraal (1956a), Elbl and Anastos (1966c), Matthysse and Colbo (1987), Walker et al. (2000), Walker, A.R. et al. (2003), Horak et al. (2018)

N: Theiler (1943b), Arthur (1975b), Walker et al. (2000)

L: Theiler (1943b), Arthur (1975a), Walker et al. (2000)

Note: the first description of the larva of Rhipicephalus evertsi  is in Howard (1908), but Theiler (1943b) found disagreement between Howard’s text and figure, and his description therefore is not included in the above list. Guglielmone et al. (2014) hypothesized that more than one species may be included under the name Rhipicephalus evertsi  .