Poecilimon bosphoricus

Chobanov, Dragan P., Kaya, Sarp & Çiplak, Battal, 2015, Contribution to the taxonomy of Poecilimon bosphoricus species group (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae): two new species from its core range, Zootaxa 3964 (1), pp. 63-76 : 74

publication ID

https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3964.1.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F4EAA42E-400A-41F7-8EAF-1E56B2132384

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5618532

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/C14B87F6-8F27-FFF8-FF55-1892B2F3FBE8

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Poecilimon bosphoricus
status

 

Key to the species affiliated to the Subgroup 2 of the P. bosphoricus group

1 a Male cercal apex narrower than the base of cerci, pointed apically ( Figs 3–5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C). Female lamellae less expanded ventrally, forming either a very narrow and deep or less widened pit ( Fig. 10–12 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A). Stridulatory teeth number 86–117 (usually over 90). Song ( Fig. 17, 18 View FIGURES 16 – 19 , 21, 22 View FIGURES 20 – 23 A, B, 24–27) with a higher number of impulses (mean> 14) in the second part...................... 2

1 b Male cercal apex very wide, wider than the base of cerci, shovel-shaped ( Fig. 2 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C). Female lamellae ventrally expanded and widely rounded, forming large shallow pit ( Fig. 9 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A). Stridulatory teeth number 70–90. Song ( Fig. 16 View FIGURES 16 – 19 A, B) with a low number of impulses (mean 11 ± 2) in the second part.......................................................... P. turciae

2 a Male cercal apex with teeth on both the external and internal/dorso-internal apex, not distinctly narrow, ending with a short tooth ( Fig. 4, 5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C, D). Female lamellae longer, forming bigger shallow pit ( Fig. 11, 12 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A, B)........................... 3

2 b Male cercal apex with a few teeth only on its external margin, narrowly pointed, ending with a long strong tooth ( Fig. 3 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C, D). Female lamellae short and laterally expanded, forming small deep pit ( Fig. 10 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A, B)......................... P. turcicus

3 a Male cerci almost straight along their basal 3 / 4, the tip angularly incurved ( Fig. 5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C); cercal apex not wider than the preceding part, not lanced-shaped, outer row of teeth longer than the inner one, outer row with 3–7, inner with 2–4 teeth ( Fig. 5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 D). Female lamellae shorter, with a distinct incision dividing them into a small anterior and large posterior lobe, forming narrower pit ( Fig. 12 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A, B)..................................................................................... 4

3 b Male cerci evenly incurved along to the tip ( Fig. 4 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C); cercal apex wider than the preceding part, lanced-shaped, length of the outer and inner rows of teeth almost equal, outer row with 6–13, inner with 4–8 teeth ( Fig. 4 View FIGURES 1 – 7 D). Female lamellae longer, not distinctly incised, forming wider pit ( Fig. 11 View FIGURES 8 – 13 A, B)......................................... P. warchalowskae sp. n.

4 a Apical fourth of male cerci narrower than the preceding part ( Fig. 5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 C, D); male subgenital plate strongly constricted in apical third ( Fig. 5 View FIGURES 1 – 7 E). Distributed in Biga Peninsula in NW Anatolia, Turkey ( Fig. 28 View FIGURE 28 )..................... P. c a n a k k a l e sp. n.

4 b Apical fourth of male cerci equal or slightly wider than the preceding part (see Fig. 4 View FIGURES 1 – 7 in Tilmans et al. 1989), male subgenital plate weakly convergent apically ( Fig. 7 View FIGURES 1 – 7 E). Distributed in the Athos Peninsula of the Balkans, N Greece ( Fig. 28 View FIGURE 28 ).... P. athos