Thecadactylus rapicauda ( Houttuyn, 1782 ), Houttuyn, 1782

Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A., 2015, Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. II. Gekkonidae, Phyllodactylidae, Sphaerodactylidae, Zootaxa 3981 (1), pp. 1-55: 7-8

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3981.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:EC68BE55-98DF-477D-8DA9-AEB04DF634D0

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5659324

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/D468879B-A12F-FFCD-35FD-F89855E8FBB8

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Thecadactylus rapicauda ( Houttuyn, 1782 )
status

 

Thecadactylus rapicauda ( Houttuyn, 1782)  

Type-locality. West-Indies, restricted by Smith & Taylor (1950) to Chichén Itzá, Mexico, and changed to Paramaribo, Suriname, by Hoogmoed (1973).

Pertinent taxonomic references. Houttuyn (1782), Schneider (1792), Daudin (1802), Cuvier (1816), Bory de St. Vincent (1828), Duméril & Bibron (1836), Fitzinger (1843), Gray (1845), Hallowel (1854), Guichenot (1855), Schlegel (1858), Boulenger (1885), Boettger (1893), Smith & Taylor (1950), Cunha (1961), Vanzolini (1968), Hoogmoed (1973), McBee et al. (1984), Schwartz & Henderson (1991), Ávila-Pires (1995), Vitt & Zani (1997), Russell & Bauer (2002), Kronauer et al. (2005), Bergmann & Russell (2003, 2007), Gamble et al. (2011 b), Kӧhler & Vesely (2011).

Distribution and habitat. Thecadactylus rapicauda   is distributed from southern North America, through Central America and Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean, to northern South America, occurring in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Cuba, British Virgin Islands, United States Virgin Islands, Netherlands Antilles, Saint Barthelemy, Antigua and Barbuda, Montserrat, Guadaloupe, Dominica, Martinique, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Grenada, Curacao, Trinidad and Tobago, Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana, Venezuela, and Colombia ( Fig. 3 View FIGURE 3 —shows primarily the South American part of this distribution). In Brazil it occurs only in Amazonia, and it is known from the states of Amapá, Pará, Maranhão, Amazonas and Roraima, with an eastern Amazonian distribution, and restricted in the west to lower Japurá, Purus and Madeira rivers ( Fig 3 View FIGURE 3 ). Thecadactylus rapicauda   is arboreal/scansorial and nocturnal, inhabits primary, secondary and varzea forests, patches of forest in open savannas, caves, xerophytic environments, and perianthropic areas not far from forest ( Kappler 1887; Barbour 1930 a; 1930 b; 1935; 1937; Gaige 1938; Smith 1938; Beebe 1944; Swanson 1945; Marcuzzi, 1954; Maslin 1963; Roze 1964; Duellman 1965; 1966; Vanzolini 1968; Donoso-Barros, 1968; Meyer & Wilson, 1973; Bullock & Evans 1990; Ávila-Pires 1995; Vitt & Zani 1998; Turvey & Cooper 1999; Howard et al. 2001; Molina et al. 2004). It is usually found on tree and palm trunks (under bark), and in man-made structures, from close to the ground to 6 meters high ( Ruthven 1922; Barbour 1930 a; 1930 b; 1935; 1937; Marcuzzi 1954; Test et al. 1966; Donoso-Barros 1968; Hoogmoed 1973; Rivero-Blanco & Dixon 1979; Gasc 1981; 1990; Bullock & Evans 1990; Rand & Myers 1990; Hoogmoed & Ávila-Pires 1991; Martins 1991; Ávila-Pires 1995; Gorzula & Senaris 1999; Vitt & Zani 1998; Howard et al. 2001). It is also found on branches and bromeliad leaves ( Russell & Bauer 2002), in fallen tree trunks, rock crevices, lianas and on understory vegetation ( Barbour 1930 a; 1930 b; 1935; 1937; Beebe 1944; Ávila-Pires 1995; Vitt & Zani 1997 — identified as eastern T. rapicauda   ; Vitt et al. 1999; Ribeiro-Júnior et al. 2006; Vitt et al. 2008).