Laemosaccus burkei Hespenheide

Hespenheide, Henry A., 2019, A Review of the Genus Laemosaccus Schönherr, 1826 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Mesoptiliinae) from Baja California and America North of Mexico: Diversity and Mimicry, The Coleopterists Bulletin (MIMICRY AND LAEMOSACCUS In an earlier paper (Hespenheide 1996), I presented the hypothesis that species of Laemosaccus of the L. nephele group with red humeral spots on the elytra were Batesian mimics of members of the Chrysomelidae in the subfamily Clytrinae. There is no evidence that Laemosaccus species are distasteful, and what is either L. nephele and / or L. obrieni have been reported as prey items of birds (Beal 1912). In Cave Creek Canyon, Cochise County, Arizona, 21 forms (species and “ subspecies ”) of Clytrinae were hypothesized to be the primary models of 22 species of mimics in the families Anthribidae (one species), Bruchidae (two species), Buprestidae (four species), Chrysomelidae, subfamily Cryptocephalinae (three species), Coccinellidae (six species), Curculionidae, subfamily Baridinae (one species), and Laemosaccus (five species). Of these, the coccinellids and the cryptocephaline chrysomelids are probably distasteful Mullerian co-mimics. Ecologically, the species of Laemosaccus co-occurred with their clytrine models on both desert legumes and canyon oaks, although more clytrine species occurred in the desert and more Laemosaccus species occurred in the canyons. Species of clytrines showing the mimetic pattern are common throughout Mexico (Bellamy 2003, who renamed the Mexican buprestid genus Acherusia Laporte and Gory, 1837 as Mimicoclytrina Bellamy to reflect their resemblance to clytrines), but decline in numbers of species and in the proportion of the clytrine fauna through Central America to Panama (Hespenheide 1996, fig. 2). Laemosaccus seems to follow a similar pattern. Mimicry is more common in large faunas, especially in wet tropical areas (Hespenheide 1986, 1995); because the largest clytrine fauna is in Mexico, the clytrine mimicry complex is also larger there (Hespenheide 1996). This complex has more members than I first enumerated and deserves further study. The evolution of mimicry produces resemblances between unrelated species (Laemosaccus and other putative mimics, with clytrines and perhaps other Chrysomelidae and Coccinellidae as models; see Hespenheide 1976, 1996) and selects against the divergence of related species. In Batesian mimicry - hypothesized to be the form of relationship between Laemosaccus and clytrines - the selection for precision of mimicry is stronger on the mimic (Laemosaccus), so that resemblances among them should be closer, regardless of ancestry. Close morphological resemblances based on ecology rather than ancestry may be termed mimetic homoplasy (Hespenheide 2005) and can make recognition of species difficult (as in Laemosaccus) or complicate phylogenetic analyses. I have speculated (Hespenheide 1996) that the sympatric “ subspecies ” of the clytrine models (Moldenke 1970) may in fact be reproductively isolated sibling species. It will be interesting to see whether or not genomic studies show the closeness of relationships among Laemosaccus species that the morphology suggests) 73 (4), pp. 905-939: 920-923

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.1649/0010-065X-73.4.905

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DC070901-29D6-4575-9F05-F98A6DE50EC7

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5213736

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/9D7CF6AF-B97C-4EB9-AF4B-B938661A91E2

taxon LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:act:9D7CF6AF-B97C-4EB9-AF4B-B938661A91E2

treatment provided by

Carolina

scientific name

Laemosaccus burkei Hespenheide
status

new species

Laemosaccus burkei Hespenheide   , new species

Zoobank.org/ urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:17742284-EF40-4803-97B3-84DCA1707746 ( Figs. 11, 12 View Figs , 22 View Figs )

Description. Holotype Male. Length 3.45 mm, width 1.70 mm ( Figs. 11, 12 View Figs ).

Very robust, subcylindrical in cross section, slightly obovate, broadly rounded behind, more narrowly so in front, black except each elytron with large red-orange spot on anterior 2/3 from lateral margins to 1 st elytral interval and obliquely rounded behind; pronotum and elytra glabrous, except narrow band of setae across anterior pronotal margin and a few small setae on 1 st elytral interval behind scutellum; thorax and abdomen ventrally, basal half of metafemora, and basal third of mesofemora with punctures each with large silvery seta effectively obscuring surface, head with conspicuous setae between and behind eyes and on base of rostrum above antennal insertions, setae sparser and more slender on tibiae, hair-like and semi-erect on tergite 8; tergite 7 with small, scale-like setae on basal margin, otherwise glabrous. Head hemispherical, 0.70 mm wide, rostrum rounded-terete, punctate, with medial polished area between antennal insertions, 0.50 mm long, antennae inserted at middle. Pronotum globose, convex at base in cross section and lateral view, conspicuously constricted before anterior margin, 1.25 mm long, 1.40 mm wide, broadest beyond basal third, with lateral margins regularly rounded, coarsely, evenly punctate, punctures rounded and separate, with distinct medial carina. Elytra distinctly wider than pronotum at base, 2.15 mm long, 1.70 mm maximum width, elytral striae much narrower than intervals, inconspicuously punctate, intervals angulate to subcarinate, interval 3 very weakly toothed on middle third, interval 5 very weakly toothed on apical half. Abdominal ventrite 1 very slightly depressed and weakly emarginate along midline, with less conspicuous setae; abdominal ventrite 5 subequal in length to ventrite 4 at middle, equal to ventrites 3+ 4 at dorsal margin. Profemora with short, broad, abruptly acute ventral tooth beyond middle. Genitalia as in Fig. 22 View Figs ; aedeagus 0.90 mm long.

Allotype Female. As male but 4.20 mm long, 2.15 mm wide. rostrum subcylindrical, polished, very finely, inconspicuously punctate, 0.70 mm long; tergite 7 convex, coarsely punctate, glabrous except with small scale-like setae on basal margin and hair-like and semi-erect setae at apical margin.

Specimens Examined. Holotype: Texas: Brazos Co., College Station , 08.04.1964, S. G. Wellso, emerged from limb of Prosopis glandulosa (TAMU)     . Allotype: Same data as holotype, but 14.04.1964, emerged from mesquite ( TAMU)   . Paratypes: USA: Texas: “Tex” (3, USNM)   ; “Tex, Collection F. H. Chittenden” (1, USNM);   “ Tex, Bolter Collection ” (6, INHS)   , [C. W. Leng collection] (2, BYU)   ; Corpus Christi Lk. , 17, 28.03.1952, 22.03.1954, D. J. & J. N. Knull (7, OSU)   ; Lower Rio Grande Valley , 12.08.1975, G. V. Manley, emerged ebony (3, TAMU)   ; Mount , [C.W. Leng collection] (1, BYU)   ; San Diego , “27.4” (1, USNM)   , “23.4,” E.A. Schwarz (2, USNM)   , “29.4,” Hubbard & Schwarz (1, USNM)   ; “ Site 55,” 10 km E Riviera, 15.05.1985, C. Scholtz, H. & A. Howden (1, CMNC)   ; Welder Wildlife Refuge , 17 km NE Sinton, 17- 25.05.1985, H. & A. Howden, C. Scholtz (2, CMNC)   ; Bexar Co., SW San Antonio, 4.05.1988, W. F. Barr, beating Prosopis   (1, WFBM)   ; Brazos Co., College Station , 11.07.1974, D. Radicke (1, TAMU)   , 14, 28.04, 4, 9.05.1964, S. G. Wellso (6, BMNH, TAMU)   , same data as Holotype, but 4.05.1964 (3, TAMU)   , 4.06.1971, W. E. Clark (1, BYU)   ; Brewster Co., Chisos Mts. , Big Bend State Pk. 12-16.07.41, R. E. White (1, CASC)   ; Chisos Mts., Big Bend , 4,5.07.42 (2, CASC)   ; Chisos Basin, Big Bend , 16.07.56, H. & A. Howden (1, CMNC)   ; Big Bend Pk., Basin Campground , 2.07.1978, J. E. Wappes (1, TAMU)   ; Marathon , 1.06.08, Mitchell and Cushman (1, USNM)   ; 1 mi. S Alpine , 7.06.1972, W. E. Clark (1, TAMU)   ; 5 mi. S Marathon , 2.07.1978, R. Turnbow (1, FSCA)   . Burnet Co., 5 mi. SE Inks Lake , 04.1988, J. Jackman & S. G. Wellso, emerged from redbud (1, TAMU)   ; Cameron Co., 4.04.1950, D. J. & J. N. Knull (1, OSU)   ; Brownsville , 25.05, 1, 8.06.1934, 08.05.1935, J. N. Knull (17, OSU)   , 25.06.1930, J.O. Martin (1, CASC)   , “ June ” (1, SEMC)   , 17.06.1971, G. H. Nelson, on Prosopis chilensis   (1, ASUHIC)   ; Brownsville, Los Borregos , 23, 24.05, 06.06.[19] 04, H. S. Barber (3, USNM)   ; Esperanza Rch. , Brownsville, VI, C. Schaeffer (1, BYU)   ; 4-6 mi. W Boca Chica , 17, 18.10.1985, J. E. Wappes (1, JEWC)   ; Laguna Atascosa NWR (site 1), 26.22375°N, 97.35454°W, 26.03- 8.04.2009, E. Riley-672, dense coastal brush, FIT-elevated (1, TAMU-ENTO X0592539), (site 2) GoogleMaps   , 26.21784°N, 97.35614°W, 2.04.2009, E. Riley-743, beating, savanna with native grasses (1, TAMU-ENTO X0833341) GoogleMaps   ; Southmost , 27.03.1951, R.S. Beamer (1, SEMC)   ; Dimmit Co., Chaparral Wildlife Management Area , 16-18.041993, A.M. Hook (1, TAMU)   ; Duval Co., 1 mi. E Freer , 4.04.1980, J. E. Wappes (1, JEWC)   , 14 mi. S Feer , 14.04.2000, R. Morris (1, RFMC)   ; Gillespie Co., 14.06.1934, 2.05.1935, D. J. & J. N. Knull (3, USU)   ; Goliad Co., 12 mi. W Kenedy , 12.05.1978, N. M. Downie (1, FMNH)   ; Hidalgo Co., 20.03.1952, 26.03.1953, D. J. & J. N. Knull (2, OSU)   ; Bentsen-Rio Grande St. Pk., 1954, H. F. Howden, reared from mesquite 30.03.1955 (1, CMNC)   , emerged 27, 29- 31.12.1975, R. Turnbow, ex Prosopsis [sic] sp. (3, FSCA, ASUHIC)   ; Bentsen St. Pk., no date, 05, 06.1978, J. E. Wappes, R[eare]d Cedar-Elm (8, FSCA, ASUHIC, JEWC, TAMU)   , 21- 24.04.1965, A. E. Lewis (1, ASUHIC)   ; Bentsen-Rio Grande Vlly. St. Pk., 21- 24.04.1970, A. E. Lewis (1, ASUHIC)   , 07.04.1991, T. Carlow & E. Riley (2, TAMU)   ; Anzalduas Co. Pk., 17.10.1989, N. M. Downie (2, FSCA)   ; 1 mi. S Pharr , 7.05.1989, E. G. Riley (2, TAMU)   , 15.04.1979, J. E. Wappes (2, ASUHIC, JEWC)   ; Santa Ana Nat’ l Wildlife Refuge , 6.04.1980, N. M. Downie (1, FMNH)   , 6.04.1980, J. E. Wappes (1, TAMU)   ; 1.8 mi. E jct 281 on Hwy 186, 6.04.1991, T. Carlow & E. Riley (3, TAMU)   ; Delta Lake , 27- 28.03.1986, E. G. Riley (2, TAMU)   ; 4 mi. W Mission , 16.04.1974, G. H. Nelson, mesquite (1, AMNH)   ; S.W. Hidalgo Co., 13.10.1946, G. B. Vogt, Prosopis juliflora Swartz DeCandolle   (1, USNM)   ; Santa Ana NWR (site 1), Jaguarundi Trail , 26.06058°N, 98.15215°W, 9.03- 5.04.2009, E. Riley-765, FIT-ground (1, TAMU- ENTO X0812079) GoogleMaps   ; LRGVNWR [Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge], Loma Unit, Massey Way ( Rd. ), 25.96012°N, 97.25343°W, 5- 6.04.2009, E. Riley-1031 (1, TAMU-ENTO X0833876) GoogleMaps   ; Jeff Davis Co., 12.07.1952, D. J. & J. N. Knull (1, OSU)   ; 166 I mi. S 118, 5.07.1978, J. E. Wappes (1, TAMU)   ; Davis Mts. , 14.06.35, J. N. Knull (1, OSU)   , 18.07.1947, W. F. Barr (1, WFBM)   ; Davis Mountains State Pk. Scenic overlook, 5100’, 17- 18.07.1982, R. S. Anderson (1, CMNC)   ; Limpia Canyon, Davis Mts. , 17- 20.06.1961, R. L. Westcott (1, ASUHIC)   ; 21 mi. W Fort Davis , 18.06.1968, S. M. Hogue, R. L. Penrose (1, WFBM)   ; Davis Mountains State Park, campground Port Davis, Hwy 118, elevation, 24.05.1992, C. R. Nelson #5817, J. Gelhaus #540, D. Koenig (1, ASUHIC)   ; Jim Hogg Co., 10 mi. S Hebronville , 10.10.1987, N. M. Downie (1, FMNH)   . Kenedy Co., 2.7 mi. S Sarita , 15.04.1991, T. Carlow & E. Riley (1, TAMU)   ; McMullen C o., WMA on rt.3445 Choke Canyon vic., 15.04.2000, Morris / Wappes (1, CMNC; 1, RFMC), 8 mi. SW of Whitsett on Farm Market Road 99, 30.03.1986, S. J. Hanselmann (1, SEMC)   ; Presidio Co., Las Cuevas @ Big Bend State Natural Area , 1190 m, N29.84957 W104.1047, 24.05.2005, A. D. Smith (1, ASUHIC)   ; Refugio Co., 8 mi. S Woodsboro , 11.04.1972, W. E. Clark (1, TAMU)   ; San Patricio Co., 6 mi. NE Sinton , 8.04.1971, W. E. Clark (1, TAMU)   , Welder Wildlife Refuge , 17 km NE Sinton, 17- 25.05.1985, H. & A. Howden, C. Scholtz (1, CMNC)   ; Starr Co., 25.05.1951, 20.03.1952, D. J. & J. N. Knull (4, OSU)   , K 6.04.1947, G. B. Vogt, beating flwrs and foliage Prosopis juliflora Swartz DeCandolle   (1, USNM)   ; Falcon St. Pk., 6- 7.04.1991, T. Carlow & E. Riley, beating Prosopis glandulosa   (5, TAMU)   ; 2 mi. W Rio Grande City , 26.03.1986, W. F. Barr (1, WFBM)   ; Rio Grande City , 8.04.1991, W. F. Chamberlain (1, TAMU)   ; Real Co., 5 mi. E Camp Wood , wood coll’ d 2.07.1971, emerged 30.01.1972, G. H. Nelson, 1” limbs, emerged ex Cercis reniformis   (1, ASUHIC)   ; Terrell Co., Independence Creek Preserve, 10.04.1999, C. P. Beacom and Bio 208 class (1, BYU)   ; Uvalde Co., Jct. Hwy. 1051 & US83, 3.05.1996, W. F. Chamberlain (1, TAMU)   ; 40- 50 km N Uvalde , 26- 31.05.1985, H. & A. Howden, C. Scholtz (1, CMNC)   ; Val Verde Co., Sycamore Ck , 12 mi. E Del Rio, 6.05.1988, W. F. Barr, beating Prosopis   (2, CMNC, WFBM)   ; Devils R @ Dolan Falls , N29.885 W100.994, 18- 21.05.2003, J. C. Abbot #1051 & Field Ent. Class (1, ASUHIC)   , Langtry , 4.11, 1982, J. Huber 7 A. Gonzalez (1, CMNC)   ; Webb Co., Laredo , 20.03.1993, M. J. Rothschild (1, CHAH).  

Other Specimens Examined. USA: Arizona: “Ariz,” Horn Coll. H8711 (1, MCZ); Cochise Co., Douglas, 2.08.1959 (1, LACM), Mule Mts., Gold Gulch, 4900’, 7-6-1978 (1, SWRS), Gleeson, 8.08.1988, T. C. MacRae (1, SEMC), San Bernardino Rch., 10- 11.06.1968, Menke & Flint (1, USNM); Guadeloupe Can., 27.06, 13.08.1977, S. McCleve, ex Celtis   (2, TAMU), 14.08.1997, F. W. Skillman Jr. (2, ASUHIC); Pima Co., Elkhorn Ranch, E slope of N end Baboquivari Mts., 28.07.1952, H. B. Leech, J. W. Green (1, CASC); Sabino Cyn., Sta. Catalina Mts., 4.09.1965, C. W. O’ Brien, ex mesquite twigs (1, ASUHIC); [Pinal Co.], 14 mi. E Oracle, 27.07.1924, J. O. Martin (1, CASC); Santa Cruz Co., Yanks’ Spring, Sycamore Cn., Tumacacori Mts., 3.08.1952, H. B. Leech, J.W. Green (1, CASC), Jct. Santa Cruz Rv. & Santa Gertrudes Rd., 23.07.2005, J. Huether (1, BYU). Mexico: Chiapas: 3 km S La Trinitaria, coll. 10.199-, F. T. Hovore, rear ex Acacia sp.   girdled by Oncideres   (1, CHAH); 26 mi. W Comitan, 4.07.1991, R. Jones & C. Mayorga (1, TAMU), 2 mi. NW Pueblo Nuevo, LLU Biol. Sta., 16.07.1965, G. H. Nelson, on Acacia pennatula   (S.&C.) Benth. (1, ASUHIC); Pq. Nac. Sumidero, Coyota Mirador, 1700 m, 21.06.1989, H. Howden (1, CMNC); Municipio Comitan, 18 mi. NW Comitan, 21.06.1965, D. Breedlove (1, CASC); Chincultik, 29.08.1982, Clark & Cave (1, ASUHIC). Coahuila: 20 mi. SE Saltillo, Rt. 015, 6000’, 20- 21.06.1971, H. F. Howden (2, CMNC), nr. Jame, 33 mi. SE Saltillo, 7500’, 18.07.1963, A. T. Howden (1, CMNC). Durango: Durango, Wickham (1, USNM); 9 mi. W Durango, 9.06.1967, 1607-CL, B(1) on Quercus undulata   (1, USNM). Estado de México: Real de Arriba, Temescaltepec, 6-7000 ft, 9.07.1933, H. E. Hinton, R. L. Usinger (1, BMNH); 3 mi. N Valle de Bravo, 28.06.1965, G. H. Nelson (1, ASUHIC). Guerrero: 9.3 km NW Chilpancingo, on rd to Chichihualco, 1555m, 15.07.1992, R. L. Westcott (1, CMNC), Chichihualco Rd 9.3 km NW Chilpancingo, 1595m, 15.07.1992, C. L. Bellamy (2, ASUHIC); 6 mi. E Tixtla, 16.07.1984, Schaffner, Woolley, Carrol, Friedlander (1, TAMU), 6 mi. E Tixtla de Guerrero, 16.07.1984, Carroll, Schaffner, Friedlander (1, TAMU). Hidalgo: 9 mi. N Zimapan, 1.10.1965, D. G. Kissinger (1, USNM); 20 mi. S Zimapan, 07.1954, D. G. Kissinger (3, USNM; 1, CSCA); 11 mi. N Zimapan, 5500’, 25.06.1971, L. B. O’ Brien, on mesquite (Texas Tech U. mesquite project) (1, ASUHIC); Hwy 85, 12 mi. S Zimapan, 6750’, 26.07.1982, C. W. & L. O’ Brien & G. Wibmer (1, ASUHIC); Hwy 105, 14 mi. S Metzquititlan, 5800’, 30.07.1982, C. W. & L. O’ Brien & G. Wibmer (ASUHIC). Nuevo Leon: 79 mi. SW Linares, Hwy 57, 6700’, 22.06.1971, Ward & Brothers (Texas Tech U. mesquite project), on Prosopis laevigata   (1, USNM), 22, 23.06.1971, C. O’ Brien & Marshall (Texas Tech U. mesquite project), on Prosopis laevigata   (3, USNM, ASUHIC); Huasteca Cyn., 17.06.1982, R. S. Miller (1, ASUHIC); 2.4 mi. S La Escondida, 4.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Ashe, Schaffner (1, TAMU). Jalisco: Jacotepec, 16.06.1967, [A. Moldenke] 1738CL, ex Prosopis   (1, CHAH), 20 mi. SW Encarnacion de Diaz, 2000 m, 9.07.1982, R. S. Miller (3, ASUHIC), 30 mi. W Tizapan, 30.06.1955, D. Giuliani (1, CASC), Lagos de, 22.06.1956, R. P. Allen (1, CASC). Michoacán: 10 mi. S Uruapan, 6.071985, Woolley & Zolnerowich 85/032 (1, TAMU). Oaxaca: 2.8 mi. E Matatlan, 24.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Ashe, Schaffner (2, TAMU); 16.1 mi. NW Totolapan, 21.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Ashe, Schaffner (2, TAMU); 10 mi. N Miltepec, 15- 16.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Hart, Schaffner (2, TAMU), 26.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Ashe, Schaffner (1, TAMU); Tamazulapan, 25.07.1974, W. F. Chamberlain (1, TAMU); 1.1 mi. W El Tule, 5400 ft, 17.07.1987, Kovarik, Schaffner (1, TAMU); 7 mi. N Huajuapan de Leon, 1.07.1982, M. A. Ivie (1, CHAH); 5 km N Oaxaca, 1700m, 14.07.1979, H. & A. Howden (1, CMNC); 9 mi. NE Mitla, 20.07.1985, Jones, Schaffner (1, TAMU); 13- 14 km E Mitla, 2100m, 5.08.1986, H. & A. Howden (5, CMNC), 8.08.1986, H. & A. Howden, beating Acacia spp.   (4, CMNC), 11.08.1986, H. & A. Howden, beating Acacia spp.   (2, CMNC); 7 km NNW Diaz Ordaz, 2200m, N17°00’ W96°26 11.07.1992, C. L. Bellamy (2, ASUHIC); 11.5 km NW Huitzo, Hwy 190, 2005m, 9.07.1992, C. L. Bellamy (1, ASUHIC); 19 mi. NW Totolapan, 28.07.1963 (1, ASUHIC); Hwy 175 @ KM 109- 112 S Oaxaca City, 27.07.2005, J. Rifkind (2, CSCA). Puebla: 6 mi. SW Tehuacan, 8- 10.07.1973, Mastro & Schaffner (1, TAMU). Queretaro: Hwy 57D, 1 mi. E Queretaro, 6700’, 28.07.1982, C. W. & L. O’ Brien & Wibmer (1, ASUHIC). Quintana Roo: 20 km N Felipe Carillo Puerto, 12- 14.06.1983, E. Riley (1, ASUHIC). San Luis Potos´ı: 11.6 km E San Luis Potosi, 1945m, 3.07.1987, R. Anderson, Acacia   -cactus scrub, 87-1 (1, CMNC); Km. 710, Hwy 57 N San Luis Potosi, 11.07.1969, Ward, Tenorio & Bennet, Host: Prosopis   (1, ASUHIC); 73 km N San Luis Potosi (on #57), 1585m, 2.06.1987, R. Anderson, R. Turnbow (1,CMNC); Matehuala, 3, 4.07.1971, B. K. Dozier (3, FSCA, ASUHIC), 27.07.1974, W. F. Chamberlain, Prosopis   (1, TAMU); 7 mi. E Cd. del Maiz, 4500’, 19.06.1983, C. W. & L. O’ Brien & G.B. Marshall (1, ASUHIC); 0.5 mi. S San Lorenzo, 5.07.1974, Clark, Murray, Ashe, Schaffner (1, TAMU); 33.8 km N Entronque El Huizache, 2.06.1987, R. Anderson, mesquite chaparral (4, CMNC, TAMU); 1 mi. SE La Calzada on #80, 3900’, 8.06.1983, R. Anderson, mesquite (3, CMNC); 45.5 km NE Villa Hidalgo, 5200’, 2.06.1987, R. Turnbow (2, CMNC); microwave tower 12 km W Rio Verde, 16.07.1982, R. Turnbow (1, TAMU); 18 mi. NW San Luis Potosi, 30.06.1971, Ward & Brothers (Texas Tech U. mesquite project), on Prosopis laevigata   (1, USNM). Sinaloa: 5 mi. N Mazatlan, 10.08.1965, G. H. Nelson, on dead limbs (1, ASUHIC). [Sonora:], Guaymas, 9.04.1921, E. P. VanDuzee (1, CASC). Tamaulipas: Abasolo, 17.05.1952, M. Cazier, W. Gertsch, R. Schrammel (1, AMNH); Hwy. 101,19 mi. NE Tula, 6200’, 23.07.1982, C. W. & L. O’ Brien & G. Wibmer (2, ASUHIC), Tampico, 26.03.1951 (1, SEMC). Zacatecas: 39.7 km S Juchipala, 1524 m, 6.08.1988, R. S. Anderson 88-26, Acacia   thorn scrub (1, CMNC), 31 mi. SE Guadelupe, 7200’, 30.06.1971, L. O’ Brien & Marshall, on Acacia   , prob. farnesiana (1, ASUHIC).  

Hosts. This commonly collected species is associated with a variety of legumes (sensu lato), most frequently with mesquite ( Prosopis spp.   , Fabaceae   ). It has the largest range of larval hosts and has been reared several times from mesquite, and specifically from Prosopis glandulosa Torr.   , “ebony” ( Pithecellobium flexicaule (Benth.)   = Ebenopsis ebano (Berland.) Barneby & J. W.Grimes   , Fabaceae   ), redbud ( Cercis reniformis Engl.   , Fabaceae   , cedar-elm ( Ulmus crassifolia Nutt.   , Ulmaceae   ), and Acacia sp.   girdled by Oncideres sp.   Adults have been taken on Prosopis laevigata (Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd.) M.C. Johnst.   , Prosopis chilensis (Molina) Stuntz   , Prosopis juliflora Swartz DeCandolle   , Acacia spp.   , Acacia   prob. farnesiana, Acacia pennatula   (S. & C.) Benth., Celtis sp.   ( Cannabaceae   ), and Q. undulata   .

Etymology. This species is named in honor of Horace R. Burke of Texas A&M University and his studies of anthonomine weevils (e.g., Burke 1959), as well as for his and his students’ extensive collections of weevils, including Laemosaccus   .

Discussion. Laemosaccus burkei   is the frequently collected southwestern and Mexican member of the L. nephele   group with dense white setae ventrally, on the frons and rostrum, and on the anterior pronotal collar that is usually associated with mesquite and other woody legumes. The specimens from western Arizona, Sonora, Durango, and other Mexican states differ from the Texas material in being smaller, somewhat more slender, and having the pronotum more coarsely punctate. Moreover, there seems to be a gap in the distributions, at least of the collections. I had originally thought they might represent a separate species, but the similarity of hosts and male genitalia recommend their treatment as conspecific at this time, although further study is warranted. Males vary in size from 2.50 to 4.20 mm (mean = 3.41 mm, n = 119); females vary from 2.80 to 4.80 mm (mean = 3.73 mm, n = 76).

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

INHS

Illinois Natural History Survey

BYU

Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum

OSU

Oklahoma State University, Collection of Vertebrates

WFBM

W.F. Barr Entomological Collection

FSCA

Florida State Collection of Arthropods, The Museum of Entomology

SEMC

University of Kansas - Biodiversity Institute

USU

Utah State University

FMNH

Field Museum of Natural History

AMNH

American Museum of Natural History