Hapalotremus major ( Chamberlin, 1916 )

Ferretti, Nelson, Cavallo, Patricio, Chaparro, Juan C., Ríos-Tamayo, Duniesky, Seimon, Tracie A. & West, Rick, 2018, The Neotropical genus Hapalotremus Simon, 1903 (Araneae: Theraphosidae), with the description of seven new species and the highest altitude record for the family, Journal of Natural History (J. Nat. Hist.) 52 (29 - 30), pp. 1927-1984 : 1944-1949

publication ID

https://doi.org/ 10.1080/00222933.2018.1506521

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1C028676-CCD9-4654-A755-6ACA3BCE3E98

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/FD618785-AA56-CA29-1B9B-CF1DFDB6675A

treatment provided by

Carolina

scientific name

Hapalotremus major ( Chamberlin, 1916 )
status

 

Hapalotremus major ( Chamberlin, 1916)

( Figures 1b View Figure 1 , 10–12 View Figure 10 View Figure 11 View Figure 12 , 36 View Figure 36 )

Hemirrhagus major: Chamberlin, 1916: 198 , fig. 8. Pérez-Miles and Locht, 2003: 366. Type material

Male holotype ( MCZ 142 ) from Peru, Cusco, Cusco Valley (Cuzco), E .D . Flint col . (A. Agassiz, April 1875), missing left palp and embolus, examined; one paratype female ( MCZ 143 ) from Peru, Cusco, Cusco Valley (Cuzco), E .D . Flint col. (A. Agassiz, April 1875), examined.

Etymology

A Latin adjective meaning greater or larger ( Chamberlin 1916).

Notes

Data labels of H . major holotype male ( MCZ 142 ) and paratype female ( MCZ 143 ) state ‘ Peru: Cuzco Valley, Coll .: E . D . Flint (rec.’d per A. Agassiz, Apr. 1875) ’. Alexander Agassiz was curator of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge , between 1874 and 1885, and made collection trips to Peru during that period . It is possible that the collector, E .D. Flint, either presented these two specimens to Alexander Agassiz while he was at the MCZ, or while he was in Peru . Both specimens were later described by Chamberlin (1916) in Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology entitled ‘ Results of the Yale Peruvian Expedition of 1911 . The Arachnida ’. It seems likely that these two specimens were not collected on the Yale Peruvian Expedition of 1911 . Chamberlin (1916) states that most of the 1911 Yale Peruvian Expedition specimens were collected by Professor H .W . Foote (p. 177) . The data label for the H . major nontype female ( MCZ 144 ) states that it was collected on the Yale Peruvian Expedition of 1911, however, no collector is cited on the label . In addition, this specimen was not collected at the type locality of Cuzco Valley, but rather at Urubamba Valley , and examination found this specimen to be an immature male ( R. C. West, pers. obs.) .

Additional material examined

One immature male ( MCZ 144 ) from Peru, Cusco, Urubamba, Urubamba (- 13.3061 S, - 72.1194 W), 2895 m a GoogleMaps .s GoogleMaps .l., July 1911, Yale Peruvian Expedition.

Amended diagnosis

Males and females of H. major can be distinguished from those of H. albipes by the presence of long spiniform setae on entire pro- and retrolateral coxal face of legs I–IV ( Figure 10b View Figure 10 ) and absence of any white setal pattern on dorsum of abdomen ( Figure 1b View Figure 1 ). Additionally, males of H. major differs from those of H. albipes by: presence of palpal tibia having the retrolateral rounded process more developed ( Figure 11c, d View Figure 11 ), tibia I roughly the same length as metatarsus I, and digitiform apophysis less developed ( Figure 11a View Figure 11 ); embolus longer and thinner than H. albipes , very curved to the retrolateral face of the palpal bulb ( Figure 11a, b View Figure 11 ); prolateral keels less developed with ventral medial crest located more basally than in H. albipes ( Figure 11a, b View Figure 11 ). Hapalotremus major male with 16 ( Figure 10e View Figure 10 ) and female with 5 ( Figure 12d View Figure 12 ) labial cuspules. Females of H. major can be easily distinguished from those of H. albipes by the spermathecae basal portion narrower than apical portion, domed apical median region and apical lateral projections more developed ( Figure 12g View Figure 12 ). Urticating setae: type III present on male ( Figure 10c View Figure 10 ) and female (abdomen of female in bad condition) and arranged in a dorsal median patch on the abdomen ( Figure 12e View Figure 12 ).

Distribution and habitat

Known only from Cusco Valley, Peru, at about 2500 m a .s .l. ( Figure 37 View Figure 37 ). A specimen of H. major ( Figure 1b View Figure 1 ) has been found near the type locality inhabiting crevices under big rocks (J. C. Chaparro, pers. obs.).

R

Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Theraphosidae

Genus

Hapalotremus

Loc

Hapalotremus major ( Chamberlin, 1916 )

Ferretti, Nelson, Cavallo, Patricio, Chaparro, Juan C., Ríos-Tamayo, Duniesky, Seimon, Tracie A. & West, Rick 2018
2018
Loc

Hemirrhagus major: Chamberlin, 1916: 198

Perez-Miles F & Locht A 2003: 366
Chamberlin RV 1916: 198
1916