Catanduba, Yamamoto, Flávio U., Lucas, Sylvia M. & Brescovit, Antonio D., 2012

Yamamoto, Flávio U., Lucas, Sylvia M. & Brescovit, Antonio D., 2012, Catanduba, a new Theraphosinae spider genus from Central Brazil (Araneae, Theraphosidae), Zootaxa 3172, pp. 1-19: 5-6

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.214015

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5679229

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B187F5-FFD4-FFB5-5891-FA11FCC8319E

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Catanduba
status

gen. nov.

Catanduba   gen. nov.

Type-species. Catanduba tuskae   sp. nov.

Etymology. Catanduba   is a noun in apposition from Tupí language, meaning Cerrado (Brazilian savanna), habitat of most species of the genus. The gender is feminine.

Diagnosis. Males of Catanduba   gen. nov. differ from those of other Theraphosinae   genera by the presence of a PIK tooth in the middle of the embolus ( Figs 2–8 View FIGURE 2 View FIGURE 3 View FIGURE 4 View FIGURE 5 View FIGURE 6 View FIGURE 7 View FIGURE 8 A, B, C) and a triangular basal nodule on metatarsus I ( Figs 2– 8 View FIGURE 2 View FIGURE 3 View FIGURE 4 View FIGURE 5 View FIGURE 6 View FIGURE 7 View FIGURE 8 D) in males and large number of spherical nodules on the spermathecae in females ( Figs 2 –4 View FIGURE 2 View FIGURE 3 View FIGURE 4 , 7 View FIGURE 7 E, F).

Description: Medium-sized spiders: total length of males 7.7–19.2, of females 13.8–26.5. Chelicerae without rastellum, furrow with prolateral line of larger teeth and group of smaller teeth on retrolateral base. Ocular tubercle wider than longer, anterior eye row procurved., posterior row recurved. Carapace longer than wider, with procurved fovea. Labium wider than longer, with cuspules on apical third (15–71). Endites with distinct anterior lobe, with 100–140 cuspules on internal basal angle. Sternum rounded, as wide as long, with one to three pairs of sigilla apparent. Stridulatory setae absent. Metatarsal scopula not divided or divided only by median longitudinal rows of stiff setae. Scopulae on metatarsus I and II longer than on III, IV. Tarsi with ventral face scopulated, divided by 1– 10 longitudinal rows of stiff setae. All tarsi without spines, claw tufts well developed. Inferior tarsal claw absent. Superior tarsal claws with one row of small teeth, medially. Two pairs of spinnerets. Posterior medium spinnerets short, one-fifth of length of posterior lateral spinnerets. Posterior lateral spinnerets three-segmented, with apical segment digitiform. Abdomen with triangular area of urticating hairs, with ornamental color in Catanduba peruacu   sp. nov., C. simoni (Soares & Camargo 1948)   , C. flavorhirta (Simon 1889)   and C. piauiensis   sp. nov ( Fig. 8 View FIGURE 8 ). Urticating hairs of type III present in males and females. Male palpal bulb with PSK and PIK. Embolus thin, with PIK tooth in median portion. Basal digitiform apophysis weak. Cymbium with two lobes, retrolateral larger than retrolateral. Leg I tibial apophysis with two branches, prolateral smaller than retrolateral. Metatarsus I with triangular basal nodule ( Figs 2 View FIGURE 2 D– 8 D) and bending between branches of tibial apophysis. Females spermathecae with two cylindrical receptacles bearing large number of nodules of different sizes ( Figs 2–5 View FIGURE 2 View FIGURE 3 View FIGURE 4 View FIGURE 5 and 7 View FIGURE 7 E, F).

Distribution. All species occur in Brazil, in the states of Piauí, Bahia, Goiás, Mato Grosso, Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo. Most species occur in areas of Cerrado vegetation (Brazilian savanna), with some introgression on Atlantic Forest by C. tuskae   sp. nov. and Caatinga   by C. piauiensis   sp. nov. and C. peruacu   sp. nov. ( Fig. 10 View FIGURE 10 , see also Rizzini, 1978 for Brazilian vegetation).