Ceroplastes ceriferus ( Fabricius, 1798 )

Choi, Jinyeong, Soysouvanh, Pheophanh, Lee, Seunghwan & Hong, Ki-Jeong, 2018, Review of the family Coccidae (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha) in Laos, Zootaxa 4460 (1), pp. 1-62: 12

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaXa.4460.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DB841017-698F-4D44-A633-461D350DC984

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0974884C-B678-FFDD-FF6C-FE87038AFECA

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Ceroplastes ceriferus ( Fabricius, 1798 )
status

 

Ceroplastes ceriferus ( Fabricius, 1798) 

( Figs 6 View Figure , 7 View Figure )

Coccus ceriferus Fabricius, 1798: 546  .

Diagnosis. Body covered with thick white wax forming a distinct dorsal horn at maturity ( Fig. 6A View Figure ). Dorsum with Ceroplastes  - type pores of 4 types present: mono-, bi-, tri- and quadrilocular pores ( Fig. 7B View Figure ); bi- or trilocular pores abundant; anal plates each with 4 apical setae; and dorsal setae variable, usually blunt, evenly distributed on dorsum except for clear areas ( Fig. 7A View Figure ). Marginal setae spinose, each with a pointed apex; with 2–4 setae present between anterior and posterior stigmatic clefts ( Fig. 7K View Figure ). Stigmatic clefts shallow, each with conical or bulletshaped stigmatic spines, arranged in a triangular area composed of about 6 setal rows ( Figs 6C View Figure , 7C View Figure ). Venter with multilocular disc-pores present on all abdominal segments, with a few pores present laterad of meta-, meso- and procoxa ( Fig. 7F View Figure ); tubular ducts each with a very narrow inner ductule, present on submarginal area of posterior abdomen and head ( Fig. 7G View Figure ); antenna 6 segmented ( Figs 6D View Figure , 7L View Figure ); and legs without tibio-tarsal articulatory scleroses ( Figs 6E View Figure , 7H View Figure ) (partially adopted from Hodgson & Peronti 2012).

Material examined. 4 ♀♀, LAOS, Paksong Dist., Champasak Prov., 30.vii.2016, coll. P.P. Soysouvanh, on Persea americana Mill.  ( Lauraceae  ).

Hosts. Polyphagous. According to ScaleNet ( García Morales et al. 2016), C. ceriferus  has been recorded from plants belonging to 80 genera in 52 families. In Laos, it has been recorded on Dracaena  sp. ( Asparagaceae  ) and Ficus  sp. ( Moraceae  ) ( Suh & Bombay 2015).

Distribution. All zoogeographical regions; Oriental Region ( India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam) ( Suh & Bombay 2015; García Morales et al. 2016).

Economic importance. Although C. ceriferus  may be not a serious pest, some authors note that it can cause damage to numerous ornamental plants by producing honeydew, which fosters the development of sooty mold ( Williams & Kosztarab 1972; Hamon & Williams 1984; Hodgson & Henderson 2000). Sooty mold blocks light and air from the leaves, impairing photosynthesis.

Remarks. Ceroplastes ceriferus  is closely related to C. pseudoceriferus Green  , as indicated by only a narrow genetic distance in the DNA barcode region of COIAbout COI ( Deng et al. 2012; Lee et al. 2012); but these species differ morphologically in the number of marginal setae. Ceroplastes ceriferus  has fewer than 15 slender marginal setae between the anterior stigmatic clefts, and about 3 marginal setae between the anterior and posterior stigmatic clefts on each side; whereas C. pseudoceriferus  has about 40 marginal setae between the anterior stigmatic clefts, and about 10 marginal setae between the anterior and posterior stigmatic clefts on each side ( Gimpel et al. 1974; Hodgson & Peronti 2012).

COI

University of Coimbra Botany Department

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hemiptera

Family

Coccidae

Genus

Ceroplastes

Loc

Ceroplastes ceriferus ( Fabricius, 1798 )

Choi, Jinyeong, Soysouvanh, Pheophanh, Lee, Seunghwan & Hong, Ki-Jeong 2018

2018
Loc

Coccus ceriferus

Fabricius, 1798 : 546